Arts & Culture

Arts and culture reports by Noe Tanigawa

Noe Tanigawa
Noe Tanigawa

  The United Health Foundation ranks Hawai‘i number 1 among states in overall health, crediting us with double digit decreases in smoking and binge drinking in the last two years.  Still, 22% of Hawai‘i’s  population is considered obese, a situation three fitness buffs are trying to address.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports from Mother Waldron Park in Kaka‘ako.

Noe Tanigawa
Noe Tanigawa

Art-making processes not only produce art, they teach life-enhancing attitudes and skills.

--Duane Preble

    An estimated 30 to 40 thousand students in Hawai‘i were introduced to the visual arts through the efforts of UH Professor Emeritus Duane Preble.  Artforms, the text he wrote with his wife, Sarah Preble is a mainstay across the nation, now in its 11th edition.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports Preble has just curated a new exhibition on the importance of Art as Process.

Noe Tanigawa
Noe Tanigawa

  The 2010 U.S. Census reported that Chamorro, the indigenous people of the Mariana Islands, are the third largest Pacific Islander group in the US.  Chamorro arrived in Hawaii aboard whaling ships in the  1800’s, and a community of seven thousand lives here now.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports on Craig Santos Perez,  a Chamorro writer living in Hawai‘i who has just won an American Book Award.

Noe Tanigawa
Noe Tanigawa

    Avid food truck enthusiasts will find the recent nexus at the old Fisherman’s Wharf  gone this week.  It will reopen in ten days as part of the new Makers and Tasters Kewalo community marketplace.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports on this new revolving collection of curated food stands.

Noe Tanigawa
Noe Tanigawa

 

  

   For over forty years community groups across O‘ahu have fought to preserve the natural coastline between Hanauma Bay and Makapu‘u.  The deadline now is August 30th to raise funds to purchase the last mauka parcels.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports on the effort to preserve the  Ka Iwi coast.

Noe Tanigawa
Noe Tanigawa

 

   O‘ahu’s eastern shore is unlike any other on the island—rugged lava cliffs drop to the sea then the drive opens onto two of the island’s premiere body surfing sites.  This is the Ka ‘Iwi coast—from Maunalua Bay to Makapu‘u, an area citizen’s groups have struggled 40 years to preserve.  A fundraising effort is underway now to secure the coastline in perpetuity.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports.

The fundraising deadline is August 30th.  

Noe Tanigawa
Noe Tanigawa

  

  William S. Merwin was United States Poet Laureate in 2010, and he’s received numerous awards including two Pulitzers for his work as a poet, translator and environmental activist.  Over the last 30 years, Merwin and his wife, Paula have been developing an internationally recognized palm garden on Maui.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa offers a look at the relationship he has with that place.

Take a video walk through the Merwin Conservancy palm forest with W.S. Merwin.

Noe Tanigawa
Noe Tanigawa

  Nonviolent action has resulted in political change in recent history:  in the American South, in Gandhi’s India, and in South Africa, just a few examples.  Now the self-described “protectors” of Mauna Kea and Haleakalā are rallying around a call for “Kapu Aloha”, a nonviolent mode of conduct that organizers say guides their movement.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports.

The Case-Flores ‘ohana shares their mana’o about the significance of Mauna Kea

Noe Tanigawa
Noe Tanigawa

    Last April, social media buzzed as sign wavings for Mauna Kea “protectors” were held as far away as Kentucky and Tonga. With that first wave of publicity over, the “protectors” both on Mauna Kea and Haleakalā now say there's a guiding principal that keeps them going.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports on Kapu Aloha. 

Noe Tanigawa
Noe Tanigawa

 

  

  

  

   A little over a year ago, 249 artists from all over Hawai‘i submitted portfolios  hoping to be included in the Honolulu Museum’s Artists of Hawai‘I exhibition.  Eight artists were chosen, and HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports on the show, now on view.  

Artists of Hawai‘i continues at the Honolulu Museum of Art through October 25th.  Artists featured in the exhibition will gather for an informal discussion in the Doris Duke Theatre  August 11, 6pm.  

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