Arts & Culture

Arts and culture reports by Noe Tanigawa

Nathan Yuen

 

  

  

  

  

  

   When was the last time you saw a butterfly?  Seventeen butterfly species make their home in Hawai‘i, and though they are often seen, the overall population of butterflies is drastically lower than fifty years ago.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa found there are efforts underway to lure even the rarer Kamehameha butterfly into home gardens.

Taimane: Stardust

Mar 23, 2015
amber crago

 

  

   Don Ho first spotted the ‘ukulele phenomenon, Taimane, when she was thirteen, and recording deals and international gigs have followed.  This Saturday, she releases her new album, “We Are Made of Stars,” at the Bishop Museum on the lawn under the stars and in the planetarium.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports.

All are invited to this free CD release party Saturday, March 28 at the Bishop Museum, Planetarium and Gallery Lawns, 7-10pm.  

Ages All Ages, Picnic on the Lawn. BYOFC (Bring your own food and chairs!)

HOT: Out of the Box

Mar 18, 2015
noe tanigawa

 

  

  

   Adventuresome culture buffs have a new experience waiting as Hawai‘i Opera Theatre unveils its first production in Kaka‘ako.  The warehouse space that houses Night Market and other events will be transformed to tell a particularly contemporary tale of deceit.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports.

Hawai‘i Opera Theatre presents “Siren Song”, six performances only through March 29th.  Street Grindz vendors will offer refreshments.  

lunalilo home

 

  

   While he was King, High Chief William Charles Lunalilo established a charitable trust to benefit Hawaiian people, especially the elderly.  This led to the creation of Lunalilo Home, first in Makiki, then, at its current location near Kokohead.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa found, it’s a sanctuary of Hawaiian culture in Hawai‘i Kai.

This Friday, “He Wa‘a He Moku, He Moku He Wa‘a” a film about canoe values, will be showing free at Lunalilo Home as part of their monthly film series.  

noe tanigawa

 

  

  

   If you’re looking for a welcoming place that mingles books and conversation, Revolution Books has been providing that space for over 38 years.  With bookstores down to a one handed count in Honolulu, HPR’s Noe Tanigawa visited a spot even many long time Honolulu residents have missed. 

Revolution Books’ Indiegogo campaign to keep them going concludes March 20th.  Check the HPR website for links.

noe tanigawa

  

  Tonight, our elected officials join in on First Friday festivities as Art at the Capitol celebrates the majestic capitol building itself.  The building  made a splash in international architecture when it was unveiled in 1969, and now that the water feature functions, it continues to serve the state today.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa spoke with the first capitol tour guide.

wikimedia commons

 

     

 

  

   

 

  

   Every year, Art at the Capitol is a night of camaraderie that revolves around works of art owned by the people of Hawai‘i.  This year, legislators will open their offices and celebrate the state capitol building itself.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa discovered the capitol is a distinctive expression of Hawai‘i’s  attributes and aspirations.

noe tanigawa

 

  

  

   The inaugural production of the new Hawaiian Theatre program at UH Mānoa sold out its first weekend at Kennedy Theatre.   HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports Lāʻieikawai is the story of how the most beautiful woman in Hawai‘i found her true love.  A special fund for Hawaiian Theatre has been started at the UH Foundation for touring and for future productions.

“Lāʻieikawai” continues at Kennedy Theatre on the UH Mānoa campus through this weekend  only.

noe tanigawa

 

  

  

The Honolulu Printmakers have invited a dynamic young Chicago team to jury their new exhibition, and a splinter group is half way through wrapping a major Honolulu building site in thousands of prints.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa surveys the activity.

The Honolulu Printmakers’ 87th Annual Exhibition opens Wednesday with festivities and a DJ.  

All are invited to the Opening Reception: 
Wednesday, February 25, 5–7 pm

noe tanigawa

 

  

  

  

 

    Does art by millennials differ from the art that has come before them?  That’s the unspoken question behind an exhibition at WCC’s Gallery ‘Iolani that features a dozen artists born between 1976 and 1991.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa spoke with one of the curators.

It's just fun to think, what are the characteristics of this millennial tribe, what are they drawn to?  Beyond that, what modes of depiction feel accurate now?  

Pages