News Bites

Wikipedia Commons
Wikipedia Commons

This week we've been looking at part of the legacy of a dozen years of U.S. nuclear testing in the South Pacific.  For survivors of those tests and their descendants, part of the story is medical treatment—and how to pay for it.  In her concluding report, Jackie Young looks at some possible solutions.

Schmidt Ocean Institute
Schmidt Ocean Institute

A research team with the Schmidt Ocean Institute has just finished mapping the world’s largest undersea volcano.

Tamu Massif is an undersea volcano off the coast of Guam which lies 6,500 feet below the surface.  For perspective- it’s about the size of New Mexico. 

Researchers aboard the Falkor research vessel were able to map about 98% of the area – filling in gaps of information about the geography of the volcano.  Scientists also collected almost 2-million magnetic measurements which help to better understand how the volcano was formed.

Wikipedia Commons
Wikipedia Commons

Hawai‘i 's Department of Human Services projects it will save about 29-million dollars a year by not providing insurance coverage for so-called able-bodied Micronesians of working age.  That group has been shifted to plans under the federal Affordable Care Act.  But healthcare advocates say the economics are more complicated.  Jackie Young has more in her continuing series about the lingering health costs of U.S. nuclear testing in the South Pacific.

Skeeze / Pixabay Commons
Skeeze / Pixabay Commons

There are now 33 reported cases of dengue fever on Hawai‘i Island- and 1 on O‘ahu.

Dengue is not endemic to Hawai‘i- and is spread through mosquito bites.  Now the State Department of Health officials are urging the public to keep safe through the “Fight the Bite” awareness campaign.

Wikipedia Commons
Wikipedia Commons

The rising cost of health care is a concern for all Hawai‘i residents.  But one group in particular is facing added medical expenses.  About 10,000 Micronesians live in Hawai‘i.  They're at the center of an issue dating back to U.S. nuclear testing in the South Pacific.  This week, Jackie Young is taking a closer look at some of that history—and how it impacts us today.

James St. John / Flickr
James St. John / Flickr

Rock formations can tell scientists a lot about changes in the earth. Fractures in bedrock affect where drinking water will flow and the path magma will take as it pushes toward the surface.

Now a team of researchers at the University of Hawai‘I, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), University of Wyoming and elsewhere has created a model that measures horizontal pressure on rock layers.

Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Garden
Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Garden

A Sumatran rhino born in the United States has been formally handed over to Indonesian authorities at a sanctuary where he is expected to mate to help save his critically endangered species from extinction.

Ken Lund / Flickr
Ken Lund / Flickr

There’s some good news coming out of the University of Hawai‘i.

According to a report released by the University - graduation rates at UH Mānoa continue to rise.  A campus wide initiative to utilize new technology, an updated student road map called the STAR system, and counseling within individual colleges are being credited with the rise.   From 2010 to 2015 the six-year rate has increased from 48.6% to 57.1%.  The four-year graduation rate has increased from 17.5% to 27.9%.

Hawaii Health Data Workshop
Hawaii Health Data Workshop

Getting a view into Hawai‘i’s current state of health may be a little easier thanks to a new website from the State Department of Health.

The Hawaii Health Data Warehouse is a collection of information gathered from surveys conducted year round.  Today the DOH released a new interactive query tool called the “Indicator-Based Information System” or “IBIS”.  Ginny Pressler is the Director of the Department of Health.  She says the new platform puts Hawaii’s health data at the public’s fingertips.

Jai Mansson / Flickr
Jai Mansson / Flickr

Governor David Ige’s emergency proclamation to deal with the homeless could sweep camps in Honolulu as early as next week.  1.3-million dollars was issued under the emergency proclamation – with a little less than half of that going to help the homeless situation on neighbor islands.

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