Louise Keali'iloma King Lanzilotti

Louise Keali‘iloma King Lanzilotti comes from a multi-ethnic background that has informed many of her beliefs. Her experience covers artistic, educational and administrative areas of the arts. As a conductor, she has been the musical director for many musicals in the past thirty years. In 2010, she founded Kalikolehua – El Sistema Hawai‘i, a free orchestra program for children from underserved neighborhoods, focused on transforming lives through music. She was the Managing Director of Honolulu Theatre for Youth for ten years (2001-2011), guiding it to greater stability through creative solutions and extensive partnerships. She served as Curator of Education at the former Contemporary Museum for thirteen years (1988-2001). Lanzilotti taught for over twenty years in public, private and alternative schools K – 12, developing a method of writing music and plays with students, which solidified her understanding of the importance of arts engagement for all.

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Have I told you yet how much I love looking through the new CD drawer (which used to be new CD piles) and finding music to share with you on Classical Pacific? A free treat every day. For today's show I found music by Samuel Barber, Ralph Vaughan Williams, Amy Beach, César Franck, Enrique Granados, Ludwig von Beethoven, Arvo Pärt, JS Bach, Claude Debussy, and Reza Vali. The last composer, Vali, is new to me, as is the cellist playing his work. A satisfying day of discovery.

Today I've created a day of concerti for you, music on various instruments and from various musical periods for Oboe, Trumpet, Violin, Bassoon, Piano, Trombone and Cello. I won't play the complete concerto in every instance, but I hope to give you a wonderful concert of varying colors and textures.

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It's Friday, and I've decided to feed you a mixed plate of leftovers today - music that made it to my desk but hasn't been shared on the air yet. You might hear music from James Galway, John Cage, JS Bach, John Adams, William Schuman, John WIlliams, Stephen Sondheim, the Brazillian String Quartet, Stephen Flaherty, Manuel de Falla, Johannes Brahms, John Cunliffe (a tuba concerto!) and Ennio Morricone.

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  In his brief life of 35 years, Mozart composed over 600 works, including 41 symphonies and 21 operas. Beethoven lived longer, but began going deaf in his 20s and continued writing more and more adventurous works even though he was almost totally deaf by 40. Today I'm playing early middle and late works by each composer, for a very small sample of the brilliant development of each composer's work. 

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  Although I regularly include women composers in my programs,  today I'm playing only works by women composers.

  As promised in the title, I'm focusing on the Letter D today - composers whose last name begins with D and/or performers with a D in their name. You'll hear music by Dallopiccola, Donizetti, Dufay, Dowland, Dieupart, Delibes, Debussy and more. It should be Delightful, Delirious, De-Lovely. 

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  In 1893 exciting works by Brahms, Sibelius, Tchaikovsky, Debussy and Rachmaninov premiered in various parts of Europe. Today, I'm going to share these works with you, alternating them with new works by Britten, Ginastera, Copland, Rogers and Prokofiev, written fifty years later. 

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Upcoming Concerts: 

  Yesterday I wandered through the library collecting interesting music to play for you, and I have lots of good choices left, so today, I'm continuing with my selections. Today, music of Brahms, Boccherini, Haydn, Beethoven, Hindemith, Tchaikovsky, Liszt, and possibly more. 

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Upcoming Concerts: 

  I like searching through the HPR library for inspiration and to find hidden gems. Today I've collected work by Charles Dieupart, Arvo Pärt, Henri Vieuxtemps, James Horner, Frédéric Chopin, Carl Ditters von Dittersdorf, Sally Beamish, Nikolai Myaskovsky, Clara Schumann-Wieck, Johann Sebastian Bach and Enrique Granados. The works stretch through the centuries, and it should be a wonderful afternoon of music.

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Today - A Day in Music. I'll begin the program with composers' interpretations of sunrise, and end with the transfigured night. Join me!

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Upcoming Concerts: 

  Today I've chosen more concerti and small chamber works than I can possibly play on the radio in three hours. I will pick as I go from the Mozart Horn concerti; Brahms violin sonatas; a guitar concerto by Steve Gray; Schubert piano sonatas; a string quartet by Ginastera, Wolf or Debussy; short works for piano and cello; a Tan Dun guitar concerto; a Vivaldi trumpet concerto, a chamber work by Silvestre Revueltas, and a piano concerto by Wilhelm Stenhammer. This may turn into a multi-day project.

Throughout the history of Western music, composers have been inspired by the work of composers who came before them. Today, I'll focus on some of those inspirations from Palestrina to Bach, Mozart, Beethoven, Brahms and Dvorák. 

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Upcoming Concerts: 

Today will be a day of contrasts. I'm looking forward to exploring the richness of traditional and new works, well-known and lesser known works, and works with unique instrumentation. Composers featured will include Johann Stamitz, Franz Doppler, Beethoven, Steven Burke, Mendelssohn, Tom Cipullo, Mozart, Schumann, Alfred Schnittke, Bartók, Tan Dun, Haydn and Glazunov!

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Day four for sharing great performers. Today I've chosen Gidon Kremer, Steven Isserlis, Stephen Hough, Wynton Marsalis, Itzhak Perlman, Jean-Pierre Rampal, Mstislav Rostropovich, Igor Kipnis, Pepe Romero and Arthur Rubinstein - performers past and present who have brought Classical music to the highest level of expression. 

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Welcome to a third day of great performers. Today I'm featuring Igor Kipnis, Pepe Romero, Jean-Pierre Rampal (twice!), Itzhak Perlman, Mstislav Rostropovich, Arthur Rubinstein, Gidon Kremer, Steven Isserlis, Stephen Hough, and Wynton Marsalis. 

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More great performers today. Artists include Yo-Yo Ma, Gustav Leonhardt, the Guarneri Quartet, Misha Maisky, José Carreras, Placido Domingo, Midori, Emerson String Quartet, Ton Koopman, Yehudi Menuhin and Martha Argerich. 

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While looking through the HPR library for great performances, I found so many that I may focus on this theme for several days. Today I've chosen performances from the Baroque through the present day. Featured performers include Alfred Brendel, Sabine Meyer, Julian Bream, Renée Fleming, Jennifer Koh, Awadagian Pratt, The Bang on a Can All-Stars, Murray Perahia, Kiri Te Kanawa and James Galway. 

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To frame the program today I've decided to use a process favored by some twentieth- and twenty-first century composers - adding the element of chance. I've selected works at random from the HPR library and I'm going to choose which pieces and in what order I play them by chance, with one caveat - as I reach the end of each hour, I need to choose a work that can finish before I get to the station ID and news. To that end, I have a separate pile of CDs with short tracks. So yes, it's kind of a math problem!

Tuesday's program covered music of the Baroque, and Wednesday featured music of the Classical Period. Today, I'm focusing on the Romantic Period. So many composers - so little time. If there's a theme for these thee days, it's the fickleness of fame - composers who were famous in their lifetime, yet faded in time, and those who may or may not have been recognized in their time, but have grown in stature over the centuries. Today, listen with me to Kalkbrenner, Saint-Saëns, Chabrier, Alfven, Beach, Albeniz, Schubert, Brahms and Massenet. 

Yesterday the program focused on Baroque Music, Today is for Music of the Classical Period. Composers featured today include Hummel, Haydn, Clementi, Boccherini, Stamitz, Mozart, Weber, Cimarosa, Beethoven and Salieri. 

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For the next three days, I decided to play music from a single period each day, featuring composers of lesser and greater current recognition. Today, I'm focusing on the Baroque and works of Telemann, Corelli, Vivaldi, Rameau, Handel, Tartini, and Couperin. I'll also be playing two works by JS Bach next to new works inspired by those works. Tomorrow, I'll focus on the Classical period, and Thursday on the Romantic period. 

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Off the Desk is just another way of saying More New Arrivals. As you can see from the pile on the desk in the library, we receive lots of new CDs - some are new releases and others are sent in the hopes that we will play them because they have merit. I like to sort through them and find gems.

  Today I'll be playing works that lie solidly within the Baroque and Classical periods and works on the leading edge of change into and out of the Classical period. New instruments, social change and the unique talent of some composers were instrumental (yes, I wrote that on purpose) in the process of change. Composers we'll listen to include Scarlatti, Telemann, Handel, JS Bach, CPE Bach, Gluck, Haydn, Mozart, Salieri, Boccherini and Beethoven. 

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One of the primary inspirations for composers has always been nature, from favorite places to seasons to flora and fauna. Today, I'm playing you a very small sample of music from our library inspired by nature, from the familiar to the possibly esoteric. You'll hear the music of Vivaldi, Respighi, Hovhannes, Borodin, Rimsky-Korsakov, Britten, Holst, Mendelssohn, Fauré, Bax, Debussy and Keola Beamer. 

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Upcoming Concerts: 

1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 5. Today, counting up: solos by Falla and Bach; duets by Mozart and Delius; one trio, also by Bach, with unusual instrumentation; quartets by Brahms and Ruth Crawford Seeger; and quintets by Dvorák and Dohnányi. Join me and enjoy the ever-changing musical texture and color throughout the program.  

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Upcoming Concerts: 

HPR receives new releases and other CDs regularly. I recently played some new arrivals, and I've found some more in the ever-bulging CD mountain in the basement of HPR. Today I'll share music of Ravel, Mendelssohn, Britten, Beethoven, Vanhal, Boccherini, Mozart, Jobim and D'Rivera. In the first hour, I'll also be remembering the amazing Beebe Freitas, who passed away this month.  When my children were small, their school had a weekly chapel service, and Beebe was their accompanist.

A theme is a convention that allows me to play you a range of music from various periods, genres, composers, etc. Today's theme is The Letter H, chosen randomly from the alphabet. Once I make a choice, I work to curate a listening experience for you that's interesting, balanced musically, and possibly educational in a small way.

I envision Classical Pacific to be a program that approaches classical music from a Pacific perspective, and that perspective affects the way I curate each show. Today, every work I am playing has a literal connection to the Pacific Rim, whether through the orchestra, the composer, the performers or the subject matter of the work. You'll be hearing performances by the San Diego Symphony, the Los Angeles Philharmonic, the San Francisco Symphony, the Seattle Symphony, Kiri Te Kanawa, Esa-Pekka Salonen, John Luther Adams, and the Knights (including local boy Shawn Conley).

Today I've again chosen great performances for your listening pleasure, including a theme and variations for one piano, a sonata for two pianos, a concerto for three pianos, a quartet by Prokofiev, an early performance by Itzhak Perlman, a great recording of Till Eulenspiegel's Merry Pranks, and a Vivaldi sonata for cello. I also just received a new recording of the Fauré Requiem that is marvelous.

Today I'll be sharing music by men and women, many of whom are related to each other in some way. You'll be hearing compositions by Thecla Badarszewska, Felix Mendelsson, Fanny Hensel (née Mendelssohn-Bartoldy), Hector Berlioz, Gustav Mahler, Alma Mahler, Clara Wieck Schumann, Robert Schumann, and Amy Beach. Makan will be joining us live on air in the four o'clock hour, to talk about his upcoming concert with the Hawai‘i Symphony Orchestra of love songs from around the world. He may also play some music for us live in the studio. 

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