Molly Solomon

General Assignment Reporter

Molly Solomon joined HPR in May 2012 as an intern for the morning talk show, The Conversation. She has since worn a variety of hats around the station, doing everything from board operator to producer.

She is now the General Assignment reporter and covers a number of important topics including education, tourism, and food sustainability. A California native, Molly joined HPR after graduating from University of California Santa Cruz with a BA in Sociology. At UC Santa Cruz, she volunteered at KZSC as well as the student newspaper, City on a Hill Press. When she's not reporting local news, Molly can usually be spotted riding her bike around Kaimuki or eating her way through Oahu's plethora of Japanese restaurants.

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Local News
8:13 am
Fri October 31, 2014

Pahoa Residents Pack Meeting on Lava Update

Hundreds of residents packed the Pahoa High School cafeteria Thursday night for a community meeting on the June 27th Lava Flow.
Credit Molly Solomon

The leading edge of the lava slowed to a stall Thursday. The lava, which has not advanced in the past 24 hours, is still 480 feet from Pahoa Village Road. Hundreds of residents attended a community meeting last night seeking answers and information on the lava front. HPR’s Molly Solomon was in Pahoa and has this report.

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Local News
7:25 am
Wed October 29, 2014

Pahoa Residents Prepare as Lava Edges Closer

Many residents were busy packing up their belongings and making preparations to evacuate.
Molly Solomon Molly Solomon

Lava flowing from Kilauea Volcano towards the town of Pāhoa has finally arrived, crossing residential property lines early Tuesday morning. Residents have had weeks to prepare for this slow-moving disaster and are now faced with the reality that their homes and businesses could be in danger. HPR’s Molly Solomon is in Pāhoa and has this report.

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Hokule’a: Voyage of Aloha
10:51 pm
Sun October 26, 2014

Tonga Welcomes Hawaiian Voyaging Canoes

Credit Oiwi TV / Nā‘ālehu Anthony

And now an update from voyaging canoes Hōkūle‘a and Hikianalia. The sister canoes are continuing to sail through Tonga and arrived in Nukuʻalofa, where they were welcomed ashore by local government officials and community members. We checked in with Hōkūle‘a navigator Ka‘iulani Murphy, as part of our ongoing series, Hōkūle‘a: Voyage of Aloha.  

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Local News
4:35 pm
Sun October 26, 2014

Lava Flow Overtakes Pāhoa Japanese Cemetery

The June 27th flow front remains active and continues to advance towards the northeast. A portion of the front is still moving through the open field, while the leading tip of the flow has advanced through the Pāhoa Japanese Cemetery.
Credit USGS

Hawaii County Civil Defense are keeping a close watch on a lava flow that continues to move toward Pāhoa. It's picked up speed in recent days, moving at a speed of 10-15 yards per day. Officials say evacuations may be just days away. 

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Local News
5:43 pm
Sat October 25, 2014

Lava Crosses Apaa Street; Officials Begin Evacuation Notices

The June 27th lava flow crossed Apaʻa Street / Cemetery Road at 3:50 AM, HST, Saturday morning, October 25, 2014.
Credit USGS

The lava flow heading towards Pahoa reached Apaa Street early Saturday morning. County officials say the lava crossed the road at 3:50 a.m. and was advancing at a rate of 10 yards per hour.

As of Saturday afternoon, the lava flow front is just six-tenths of a mile from Pahoa Village Road, the main drag that runs through town. County crews are currently going door-to-door to about 50 homes, alerting residents that are down-slope of the flow to prepare for a possible evacuation in the next three to five days.

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Local News
8:48 am
Fri October 24, 2014

Lava Flow Quickly Advances Toward Pahoa

A closer view of the flow front from the air, showing the narrow lobe of lava moving along the dirt road. Kaohe Homesteads is in the left side of the photograph. Puʻu ʻŌʻō can be seen in the upper right.
Credit USGS

UPDATED:

A Friday morning flyover revealed the lava flow had moved 300 yards overnight. Hawaii County Civil Defense officials say the leading edge of the approaching flow is now 250 yards, or less than one tenth of a mile, from Apaa Street, near the Pāhoa Transfer Station.

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Local News
10:57 pm
Wed October 22, 2014

Scientists Discover Massive Tsunami That Struck Hawaii 500 Years Ago

A massive wave strikes a pier in Hilo during the 1946 tsunami.
Credit NOAA

Scientists have found evidence of a massive tsunami that slammed into Hawaii nearly 500 years ago. That’s according to a new study released this week, that’s prompting state officials to re-examine their tsunami evacuation plans. HPR’s Molly Solomon reports.

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Local News
12:58 am
Mon October 20, 2014

Hurricane Ana Soaks State, Passing South of the Islands

Rough conditions in Waikiki as heavy rain begins to come down on Oahu Saturday afternoon.
Credit Molly Solomon

Hawai'i residents and visitors were spared a direct hit by a hurricane this weekend. Ana has now been downgraded to a Tropical Storm and is continuing to move on its westward path, away from the islands. HPR's Molly Solomon has more.

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Local News
12:01 am
Fri October 17, 2014

The History Behind Naming Hawaiian Hurricanes

Credit NASA

Tropical Storm Ana continues to churn towards Hawai’i. Its name was selected from a list, reserved for storms formed in Hawaiian waters. HPR’s Molly Solomon takes a closer look at the history behind the naming of Hawaiian hurricanes.

What’s in a name? In the case of Hawaiian hurricanes -- quite a lot. Robert Ballard is with the Central Pacific Hurricane Center. “If the disturbance or tropical depression develops into a named storm between 140°W and the dateline, then it gets a central pacific name.”

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Local News
12:01 am
Mon September 29, 2014

Searching for Family Roots in Pahoa

Pahoa Japanese Cemetery
Credit Molly Solomon

As the lava flow from Kīlauea threatens to hit the town of Pāhoa, the potential cutting off of memories is also a concern. As part of our ongoing series, HPR’s Molly Solomon takes a personal look at what that means to people who may never be able to go back.

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