Neal Conan

Over 36 years with National Public Radio, Neal Conan may be best known as the long-time host of NPR’s “Talk of the Nation." Previously, he served as bureau chief in New York and London, covered the Pentagon, the State Department, the White House, two Winter Olympic Games, and several wars. He anchored innumerable live events, including party political conventions, confirmation hearings for Supreme Court nominees, Presidential inaugurations and addresses, and the impeachment of President Clinton. He played a key part in NPR’s live coverage of 9/11 and the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. As a war correspondent, he was among a group of journalists held by the Iraqi Republican Guard for nearly a week in the waning days of the 1991 Gulf War. Behind the scenes, he served as editor, producer and executive producer of NPR’s flagship program, “All Things Considered” and, in an acting capacity, as foreign editor, managing editor and news director. Conan’s work has been honored with, among others, Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University, Major Armstrong, and Peabody awards. On leave in 2000, Conan worked as the play-by-play announcer of the Aberdeen Arsenal of the independent Atlantic League and wrote a book, Play by Play: Baseball, Radio and Life in the Last Chance League. Conan was born in 1949 in Beirut, Lebanon. A long-time East Coast resident, he now resides in the town of Hāwī on Hawaiʻi island, where he farms macadamia nuts and works as a news analyst for Hawaiʻi Public Radio.

Phillip Capper / Flickr
Phillip Capper / Flickr

Results are in from Vanuatu's snap election, which followed a scandal that saw 14 members of Parliament convicted on bribery charges.  Several prominent politicians lost their seats, but, as we hear from Neal Conan in the Pacific News Minute, no clear winner emerged.

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Wikipedia Commons

The fallout from North Korea's nuclear test earlier this month continues. En route to Beijing, a senior US diplomat warned that if China does not act to rein in its ally - the United States will take steps that China may not like.  More from Neal Conan in the Pacific News Minute.

Pixabay Commons
Pixabay Commons

After American companies refused to honor an agreement reached with Pacific Island nations, the US announced yesterday that it will withdraw from a treaty that's covered tuna fishing rights in much of the South Pacific for almost 30.  Seventeen countries depend on the promised payments for this year's budget while American Samoa could lose its biggest industry....we have more from Neal Conan in the Pacific News Minute.

Wikipedia Commons
Wikipedia Commons

The Prime Minister of the Solomon Islands vows that a new battlefield memorial will be completed on Guadalcanal in time for ceremonies on the 75th Anniversary of the battle.  US Marines waded ashore on Red Beach on August 6th, 1942, beginning a six month struggle that marked a turning point of the Second World War in the Pacific.  We have more from Neal Conan, in the Pacific News Minute.

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Wikipedia Commons

Yesterday, a week after North Korea tested a nuclear weapon - South Korean troops opened fire on a drone as it crossed the demilitarized zone from the north.  The Yonhap news agency reports that the unmanned aircraft turned back after about 20 shots. North and South Korea are also blasting propaganda at each other from huge loudspeakers along the DMZ; all part of a difficult week for South Korea's president, as we hear from Neal Conan in the Pacific News Minute.

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Wikipedia Commons

Yesterday, the Supreme Court of the Philippines approved an agreement that allows American Forces to use Philippine bases for the next ten years.  Manila is among the most vocal critics of China's ambitions in the area but lacks the military strength to dispute its claims.  Now, that could begin to change, as we hear from Neal Conan in the Pacific News Minute.

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Wikipedia Commons

US tuna boats in American Samoa are said to be losing $8-thousand every day the fleet sits, tied up at the dock.  As we've reported, when US operators failed to make a payment due December 31st, the Pacific Forum Fisheries association lifted their licenses.  Efforts to resolve the impasse continue, but as we hear from Neal Conan in the Pacific News Minute - that's not the only dispute involving Pacific Nations, Tuna and foreign fishermen.

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Wikipedia Commons

American Tuna boats are idled in Pacific ports after failing to make an agreed payment to renew their licenses.  The Honolulu office of the National Marine Fisheries service informed them said they cannot fish in the Western Pacific as of January 1st.  The US companies want to renegotiate an agreement they reached with Pacific Island nations just five months ago.  More, from Neal Conan in the Pacific News Minute.

YunHo LEE / Flickr
YunHo LEE / Flickr

Last week, Japan and South Korea announced agreement on the painful issue of the so-called comfort women.  A deal welcomed by the United States, which hopes its two allies can work together on regional security.  But the celebrations may have been premature, as we hear from Neal Conan in the Pacific News Minute - a couple of major problems remain.

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Wikipedia Commons

US presidential hopefuls will spend most of January in Iowa and New Hampshire as the primary and caucus season gets underway.  We know that one of them will be elected later this year.  Four Pacific Island nations could get new political leadership this month.  As we hear from Neal Conan in today's Pacific News Minute, one new president has already been chosen.

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