Noe Tanigawa

Arts & Culture Reporter

Ways to Connect

creative commmons
creative commons

  February is African American History Month, and the folks at the Honolulu Museum of Art will be celebrating with a specially themed ARTafterDARK this Friday.  Get ready for a night of Afrofuturist films, music, and activities including what’s billed as Hawai‘i’s first large-scale public silent disco.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports.

SHADE
SHADE

 

   Every now and then we in Honolulu like to think of ourselves as a world class city.  Or at least, we look at the pantheon of world class cities, New York, Tokyo, Shanghai, Paris, etc. and imagine growing up to be one.  Assessing our current built environment, one could wonder if we really are on the right track.

Suzuran Photography
Suzuran Photography

 

   Subtleties of color, images with detail and refinement, those are the qualities of aizuri-e,  the Prussian blue Japanese wood block prints.  The four young players in the Aizuri Quartet say they identify with those qualities, and try to embody them in their music.  The Aizuri Quartet has been hailed for that most elusive of qualities, the perfect balance between virtuosity and the sound of the whole, and they're bringing their brand of exuberance and meticulousness to Honolulu.

Noe Tanigawa
Noe Tanigawa

    First Fridays created a scene for arts and partners in Honolulu’s Chinatown.  Now the area’s shops and galleries want to do the same thing for families on Second Saturdays.  This Saturday,  The Fuzz will conduct valentine crochet fun at the Hawai‘i State Art Museum, and a craft fair will unfold at Next Door Lounge.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa found there’s a lot more going on too.

Artist, art educator, Su Atta, has been combining counseling and artmaking for over 30 years.  She says skills carry over into life.

Noe Tanigawa
Noe Tanigawa

  

  In 1985, Japan’s Prince Hitachi planted the cherry trees fronting Leilehua High School to celebrate the centennial  of Japanese immigration to Hawai‘i.  He was contributing to the hundreds of sakura that now bloom every spring in Wahiawā ---depending on the weather.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa found many of the trees trace back to one ancestor from Okinawa via Waipi‘o.

Noe Tanigawa
Noe Tanigawa

  

  William S. Merwin was United States Poet Laureate in 2010. He’s received numerous awards, including two Pulitzers, for his work as a poet, translator and environmental activist.  Over the last 30 years, Merwin and his wife, Paula, have been developing an internationally recognized palm garden on Maui.  Just recently, the Merwins established a conservancy to ensure the garden’s perpetuation, and they are developing programs to make it a beacon for both environmentalists and artists.

DENISE DE GUZMAN
DENISE DE GUZMAN

    

 

 2005 may have been the height of Hawai‘i’s ice “epidemic.”  That year, Hawai‘i police arrested  719 people on meth charges.  Though we haven’t heard a whole lot about it since, crystal methamphetamine hasn’t gone away, and some fear it has just become part of our social fabric.   HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports on a new production at Kumu Kahua that makes you wonder how prevalent this drug still is.

las cafeteras
las cafeteras

  Gangs, crime, housing projects, East Los Angeles is a predominantly Latino area with a reputation.  The violent crime rate in East L.A. is double that of the rest of California, and crime in general runs almost three times the national average.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports on an East L.A. band that sings, with joy, about their roots in the community.

Noe Tanigawa
Noe Tanigawa

  Ecologists and divers are the first to wax poetic about Palau, recognized as one of the richest underwater dive spots in the world.  Palau’s reefs are at the crossroads of three of the planet's major currents and the nutrient-dense water helps create the most bio-diverse region in the world, here in the Pacific.  In this final segment of a series on Palau, HPR’s Noe Tanigawa takes a look at the future.

Noe Tanigawa
Noe Tanigawa

  The first habitations on Palau could date to ten thousand years ago, settled by sailors from Indonesia or the Philippines.  Like Hawai‘i, Palau’s period of Western contact began in the late 1700’s, with trade, missionaries and change to follow.  In a recent visit, HPR’s Noe Tanigawa found that though Palau’s traditional matrilineal society is beginning to change, women wield a lot of power in the home and in government.

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