Local Musicians with Yale Ties in Concert at Atherton Studio, July 21

Jul 5, 2018

Hawaii-based violinists Nancy Shoop-Wu and Duane Padilla, with classical guitarist Ian O’Sullivan, perform under the name of Eli 3.0, an homage to their shared training at the Yale School of Music. On Saturday, July 21, they return to HPR’s Atherton Studio with works by Bach, Piazzolla, Liliʻuokalani, and some of their own original compositions.

Reservations may be made online at www.hprtickets.org or by calling the station (955-8821) during regular business hours. Tickets are $25 general, $20 for HPR members, and $15 for students with ID; online service fees apply. The Atherton Studio is located at Hawaiʻi Public Radio, 738 Kāheka Street. Doors open at 7:00 p.m.; music begins at 7:30 p.m.
 
About the artists
 
Nancy Shoop-Wu is a Hawai‘i Symphony Orchestra violinist and singer/songwriter.  She began her musical life in Connecticut, where she began playing the violin at the age of nine. Her musical studies eventually took her to Hartt School of Music, followed by Yale School of Music, where she studied with renowned violin teachers Paul Kantor and Ida Kavafian. While still a student Nancy won a scholarship to attend the Tanglewood Institute and began auditioning for professional orchestras, winning a position with the Filarmonica de Caracas when she was just 20 years old. After nine months, she returned to the U.S to finish her training. Within a year of graduating from Yale she had won positions in New Haven Symphony, Hartford Symphony, and Orchestra of New England. It was her next stop, however, which would change her life in a much more dramatic way, when she successfully auditioned for a chair with the Honolulu Symphony and moved to Hawai‘i.

As a member of the Honolulu Symphony (now Hawai‘i Symphony) she began to explore a broader musical world, sharing the stage with not only top Hawai‘i musicians, but also classical and genre-crossing superstars from Yo-Yo Ma to Bela Fleck. Inspired by the rich musical world she found in Hawai‘i, Shoop-Wu began to compose her own music. Her original island-inspired songs also feature Hawai‘i musicians Jeff Peterson, Ian O’Sullivan, Dean Taba, Garin Poliahu, and Los Angeles producer and pianist Derek Nakamoto.

Shoop-Wu has recorded two solo CDs -- Beautiful Mana‘o and Rainbow Road. The latter was recently nominated for two Zone Music Reporter awards (contemporary instrumental album of the year and best new artist) and was also a Hōkū-award finalist in 2016. She was recently featured on HI Sessions and her music has been played on public radio and new age music stations across the world.

Eli 3.0, (l. to r.) Ian O'Sullivan, Nancy Shoop-Wu, Duane Padilla

Ian O’Sullivan was proclaimed by Classical Guitar as "thoughtful" and praised by The Honolulu Advertiser as "delightful." He is a classically-trained guitarist and composer from the North Shore of O‘ahu. Well-versed in Hawaiian slack-key guitar and the ‘ukulele, in addition to the Western classical repertoire, O'Sullivan has performed throughout the United States, including Carnegie's Weill Recital Hall, New England Guitar Society, and Hawai‘i Public Radio’s Atherton Studio. In 2013, he released his first solo album Born and Raised, featuring his original compositions alongside music of fellow Hawaiian natives. It was nominated for three Nā Hōkū Hanohano Awards (Hawaiian Grammies) in 2014, including instrumental composition of the year and most promising new artist.

As a child, O’Sullivan began playing the ‘ukulele by ear. He then experimented with electric guitar in a rock band during high school years at the Kamehameha Schools, familiarizing himself with contemporary styles of reggae, hip-hop, and jazz through tablature and recordings. In 2001, he entered the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa as a Marine Biology major, though it was not long after that he met Grammy-Award-winning artist and then UH lecturer of classical guitar Jeff Peterson who introduced him to the world of classical guitar. During his years at UH, O'Sullivan transformed from a non-music-literate, garage-band guitarist to being the first guitarist from Hawai‘i to be accepted at Yale University’s School of Music.

He returned to O‘ahu in 2012, accepting the lectureship in classical guitar from his alma mater. He has recently performed  at the New York Classical Guitar Society, Minnesota Guitar Society, The California Conservatory of Guitar, University of Indianapolis, The Cue-Concord, the Hawaiian Slack Key Guitar Festival, The Korea International Guitar Festival, and Benjamin Verdery’s Maui Guitar Class. He is a proud graduate of The Kamehameha Schools, and the recipient of the Yale Elliot Fisk Award.

Duane Padilla earned degrees from Northwestern University and Yale University. He began his performance career as an orchestral musician, performing with the National Repertoire Orchestra, the Tanglewood Music Center Orchestra, the New Haven Symphony, and the Honolulu Symphony Orchestra. Also an active classical chamber music performer, his ensemble, The Gemini Duo, was a semi-finalist in the prestigious International Concert Artists Guild Competition in NYC, and earned outreach grants from Chamber Music America and the American Federation of Musicians. Padilla’s more recent artistic endeavors have turned towards jazz. As a founding member of The Hot Club of Hulaville, he won the Hawaii Academy of Recording Arts' award for jazz album of the year for their gypsy jazz release Django Would Go! His subsequent solo jazz violin album Sentimental Swing was named one of the top 40 jazz releases of 2011 by the South African Jazz Educators Association.

Recent concert collaborations include duo performances with pianist Tommy James (music director of the Duke Ellington Orchestra NYC), finger-style-guitar legend Jeff Linsky,  guitarist Paul Mehling (Hot Club of San Francisco), Grammy-winning Hawaiian slack key guitarist Jeff Peterson, and jazz ‘ukulele grand master Ben Chong. He has opened concerts for jazz giants Martin Taylor, John Jorgensen, and John Pizzarelli.

An equally accomplished educator, Padilla studied Suzuki violin pedagogy with Betty Haig, Lisa Hershumgel, Stevie Svenden, Teri Einfeld, Alan Lieb, as well as Rolland/Zweig Pedagogy with Stacia Spencer. He has studied conducting with Marvin Rabin, William Jones, and Shinick Hahm. He has studied jazz violin with Tim Kliphuis, Ben Powell, and Aaron Weinstein, Jason Anick and Christian Howes. Padilla began his teaching career in Connecticut where he was head of the Suzuki Program at the Tabor Community Arts Center and the Bethwood Suzuki School. While in Connecticut, he also designed and implemented a unique public school string program for grades 1-3 based on the Suzuki violin method for Wintergreen Magnet School.  He has served as President of the Hawaii Chapter of the American String Teachers Association and has also served on the Board of Directors of the Suzuki Association of Hawaii and the Suzuki Talent Education of Hawaii. He currently is on faculty at the Punahou Music School and Chaminade University. He was formerly the Chair of the American String Teachers Association's Eclectic Styles Committee and is now serving on its Executive Board.

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