China

Wikipedia Commons
Wikipedia Commons

The search for extra-terrestrial life is forcing thousands of earthlings to move. The developments are taking place in southwestern China—and HPR’s Bill Dorman has the details in today’s Asia Minute.

China is building the world’s largest radio telescope—and plans to have it fully operational later this year.  Just this week, officials announced that as part of the plans, more than 9,000 people are going to have to move.

Wikipedia Commons
Wikipedia Commons

The Hawai‘i Clean Energy Initiative says wind power is one of the “most viable” options for the state when it comes to renewable energy. It’s also a growing source of electricity in China. And new figures out this week shows the pace of adoption is picking up there. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

About a third of the world’s wind power is online in China….which has now blown past the European Union as the leading region for this energy source.  17% of the globe’s wind power capacity is installed in the United States…about 10% is in Germany.

Isaac "AYE MIRA" Sanchez / Flickr
Isaac "AYE MIRA" Sanchez / Flickr

While China’s stock market has been volatile lately, this has been a week of big business deals involving Chinese financing.  Buy-outs involving two California companies in very different lines of business underline the growing appetite for corporate acquisitions.  There’s a multi-billion dollar cash agreement for a Hollywood production company and a much smaller deal involving  a gay dating app. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

tonynetone/ Flickr
tonynetone/ Flickr

Three trading days into the New Year, financial markets around the world remain uncertain. And a lot of that nervousness begins with China. Part of it relates to the economy, but it’s also uncertainty about what the government will do when it comes to the stock market. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

Transparency has never been a particular strength of China’s stock market.  Investors at home and abroad know the government plays a role in the market, but the extent is a moving target and not always clear.  This week is a good example.

lockerdome.com
lockerdome.com

2015 was a record year at the movies. In the United States, box office sales topped 11-billion dollars. And it was also a record-setting year in China. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

Here’s a statistic any business would like: annual growth of 49%.  That’s what happened to ticket sales for movies in China during 2015.  Government figures released Thursday show box office receipts of nearly 7-billion dollars last year - up from about one and a half billion dollars just five years ago.

Wikipedia Commons
Wikipedia Commons

The latest big investor in local commercial real estate is a Chinese company. Developer Jeff Stone says China Oceanwide Holdings paid 200-million dollars to buy two Ko Olina Resort beachfront parcels. The Star Advertiser first reported the deal—adding that the company plans to make a billion-dollar investment on the site. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more on the company in today’s Asia Minute.

Wikipedia Commons
Wikipedia Commons

If you saw a movie over the weekend, you’re already part of one of Hollywood’s most important seasons.  The period from Thanksgiving through New Year’s weekend is critical for box office performance. But this year, there’s a twist from overseas.  HPR’s Bill Dorman explains in today’s Asia Minute.

It’s a big season for Hollywood…and part of the news is coming from China.  Last week, movie ticket sales in China swept past a milestone: 40-billion yuan… with several weeks to go in the year.

Wikipedia Commons
Wikipedia Commons

State media in China reported positively on this weekend's historic meeting between the Presidents of China and Taiwan - the first such summit since 1949.  Reaction on Taiwan was mixed, particularly on a sore subject: Chinese missiles.  More from Neal Conan in the Pacific News Minute.

Asked about the multitude of ballistic missiles on China's side of the Taiwan Strait - President Xi Jinping replied “the missiles weren't aimed at Taiwan,” a claim that might be charitably described as a diplomatic fiction.

APEC 2013 / Flickr
APEC 2013 / Flickr

There’s been a lot of publicity about a meeting this weekend between the leaders of Taiwan and mainland China.  That meeting takes place in Singapore on Saturday.  But there’s been a bit less publicity about another stop the China’s leader is making before that.  HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

Naval Surface Warriors / Flickr
Naval Surface Warriors / Flickr

It's been a week since the guided missile destroyer USS Lassen challenged China's claims in the South China Sea.  We've learned a bit more about that mission since, and about a new development, that could shift this controversy from international waters, to an international court.  More from Neal Conan in the Pacific News Minute.

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