culture

Wikimedia Commons
Wikimedia Commons

  You would figure that two countries with democracy and open-market economies would be able to work closely together. But that’s not the case between Japan and South Korea. And although they have specific values in common, how they deal with one another and the U.S. deals with both is often a case of national identity. We talk to two scholars who call for a grand bargain in their new book. That’s today at 5 on HPR-2.

Flickr Commons
Flickr Commons

  The number of visitors to Hawai‘i from South Korea has grown substantially in recent years. And Hawai‘i has been home to a significant Korean community for more than a century. In fact, the first large group of Korean immigrants to the United States landed in Hawai‘i in 1903, to work on the sugar plantations. When it comes to South Korea today, certain international attitudes are shifting. HPR’s Bill Dorman explains in today’s Asia Minute.

In the 1970’s and 80’s, there was so much business activity in Singapore, Hong Kong, Taiwan, and South Korea they were dubbed the Four Asian Tigers.  Based on per capita income,  Singapore and Hong Kong achieved advanced economic status in the late 80’s, Taiwan followed in 2010, Korea, however, has lagged far behind.  Research into this disparity shows that social trust could be key to economies of the future.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports.

Hawaii is not the only place where the use of pidgin gets debated. In Singapore, the use of language is the topic of an annual government campaign. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

Molly Solomon
Molly Solomon

For most Chamorro people living in Hawai`i, hearing the language of their ancestors is a rare thing. But, as HPR’s Molly Solomon reports, members in the Pacific Island community are working to revitalize the language and keep it alive for generations to come.

The Chamorro language class meets weekly at Kaka'ako Kitchen, every Saturday at 10 am.

For more information on the class, contact Kenneth Gofigan Kuper at kennethkuper@gmail.com or the Marianas Club at marianas@hawaii.edu.

Flickr / chibirashka
Flickr / chibirashka

March turned out to be another month of growth for tourism in the state. The Hawaii Tourism Authority says overall visitor arrivals were up 7.6% compared to a year earlier, while visitor spending was up 7.8%. The number of tourists coming from Japan was also up—by a little more than four percent. And a growing trend for those Japanese visitors is a movement beyond Waikiki---searching for a more local experience. HPR’s Molly Solomon reports.

Eric Yanagi

Nearly 40 years ago, a 22-year old artist decided to document the changing landscape of Honolulu's most famous neighborhood --- Waikiki.  That artist was local photographer Eric Yanagi.  

Thanks to a state grant, Yanagi completed the year-long project in 1973. His focus was on the community that was living in a rapidly developing Waikiki.  Now he’s compiled a collection of his photographs that are on display at UH Manoa, “Framing Paradise: Photography and Waikiki.”