economics

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Northwest Hawaiian Islands Coral Health; Economic Slowdown; Gender Pay Gap

Wikimedia Commons
Wikimedia Commons

As you heard earlier on NPR, the United Nations Security Council has unanimously passed another round of trade sanctions against North Korea. The move won the support of China, which is having trade issues of another kind with SOUTH Korea. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

Wikimedia Commons
Wikimedia Commons

There are many ways to identify factors that spark economic development. Businesses and investment capital can create jobs. Consumer spending can boost an economy. And according to a new study from Australia, a good surf break can also make a difference. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

Tracy O / Flickr
Tracy O / Flickr

President Trump talked about economic growth in his address to a joint session of Congress. Figures out Tuesday showed the U.S. economy grew at a rate of 1.6 percent last year—its weakest performance since 2011. In Asia, the latest economic figures continue to show faster growth—but the future carries some question marks. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

Republic of Korea / Flickr
Republic of Korea / Flickr

Political scandal is still dominating the news in South Korea. The president’s powers have been suspended and her future remains uncertain. The parliament is in transition and to the surprise of some, financial markets remain relatively calm. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

South Korea started the week with the Prime Minister as acting president.  The ruling political party is split between those who remain loyal to President Park Geun Hye, and those who joined in voting for her impeachment last week on allegations of influence peddling.

S. / Flickr
S. / Flickr

The US presidential election has not only dominated the US news cycle for weeks, it’s also been a focus overseas. HPR’s Bill Dorman looks at early media reaction from the Asia Pacific in today’s Asia Minute.

Shock, disbelief and uncertainty.  And that was just the reaction of financial markets in the Asia Pacific.  As Donald Trump pushed closer to the White House, regional stock indices tumbled.  Markets around Asia closed before the election was settled—with Japan taking the biggest hit.

The Nikkei sank more than five and a third percent—to a three-month low.

Paul Downey / Flickr
Paul Downey / Flickr

One in six Hawai‘i residents lives in poverty.  That’s according to new figures from the US Census Bureau….which includes the cost of living as part of the calculation.  The traditional measure of poverty is based only on income.

When you figure in the cost of living, Hawai‘i’s poverty rate skyrockets from 11% of the population to nearly 17%.  Nicole Woo is the senior policy analyst with the Appleseed Center for Law and Justice.  She says the latest figure is a reminder that Hawai‘i’s relatively low unemployment rate only tells part of the state’s true economic story.

Wikipedia Commons
Wikipedia Commons

Treasury Secretary Jack Lew made a quick stop in Hawai‘i on his way back from the G-20 Leaders Summit in China.  Lew spent Labor Day in Honolulu—where he held a roundtable discussion with some local business and community leaders.

www.bizjournals.com
www.bizjournals.com

Last year, Catherine Ngo became president and CEO of Central Pacific Bank. Pacific Business News caught up with Ngo this week to learn more about her plans. Editor in Chief A. Kam Napier has the story.

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Wikipedia Commons

The Prime Minister of Singapore is spending most of this week in Washington. It’s the first official state visit by a Singaporean leader in more than 30 years. And discussions will include at least one topic that came under fire at the political conventions of both republicans and democrats. HPR’s Bill Dorman explains in today’s Asia Minute.

JasonParis / Flickr
JasonParis / Flickr

The concept of income inequality was a theme of Bernie Sanders’ presidential campaign, and it’s getting some attention this week at the Democratic National Convention. It’s also getting some publicity in Indonesia—where it played a role this week in a government shakeup. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

Wikipedia Commons
Wikipedia Commons

Financial markets in Asia began the week with a more measured view of events in Britain than the US stock market.  Some of the larger equity markets even began the week with strong gains, while currency markets have had a more complicated reaction.  HPR’s Bill Dorman has details in today’s Asia Minute.

When it comes to big money in Asia, it’s still early to fully evaluate the implications of Britain’s exit from the European Union.  After steep sell-offs last week, stock markets across Asia have generally calmed down a bit.

Flickr

Economic Outlook for Hawaii; #iambadatthis; 11th East-West Philosophers' Conference; Honolulu Jazz Quartet

UHERO County Economic Forecast: Dr. Carl Bonham

The Conversation: Thursday, April 21st, 2016

Apr 21, 2016
Flickr - Brian

Effect of Global Economic Factors in Hawaii; Erhu Virtuoso Tsun-Hui Hung; New Law Enforcement Legislation; Encouraging Young Farmers on Kauai 

Tourism Impact on Hawaii’s Markets/Economy: Russell Price

The Conversation: Wednesday, April 20th, 2016

Apr 20, 2016
flickr - Afghanistan Matters

New Ideas on Old Biases; Preserving Ancient Treasures with Modern Technology; Economic Development in the Asia-Pacific; Holistic Health and Chakras

Long View: Neal Milner

pixabay Commons
pixabay Commons

The global economy should continue on a growth path for the next several years, but at a slower pace. That’s the word from the International Monetary Fund, which has revised its world economic outlook. But when it comes to regions of the world, Asia is still generally a strong performer. HPR’s Bill Dorman has details in today’s Asia Minute.

Pixabay Commons
Pixabay Commons

Tourism brings more than 8-million visitors to Hawai‘i each year--a fact that has attracted a number of international businesses looking to capitalize on brand exposure.  That includes companies selling Korean cosmetics.  It’s a niche that has led to several new stores in the state over the past few years—and continues to be a growing part of Korea’s international trade. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

Karn Bulsuk / Flickr
Karn Bulsuk / Flickr

US stocks are trading today on the news of the latest jobs report out this morning. The US market closed an active first quarter of 2016 just about where it started the year.  But for many Asian markets, it was a very different story. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

Volatility is one word for Asia Pacific stock markets in the first quarter of 2016.  You may recall how a tumbling Chinese market helped send relative panic through global markets in the early part of the year…driving most US indices down more than 10% by mid-February.

Town Square: State Budget Health

Feb 11, 2016
Wikipedia Commons
Wikipedia Commons

  If your eyes glaze over trying to deal with your own budget, imagine the jobs of the State Director of Finance Wes Machida and the Acting State Auditor Jan Yamane. We'll take up the health of the budget, and the intersection of money and policy...that can often bring more than a few eye rolls.

Vinoth Chandar / Flickr
Vinoth Chandar / Flickr

For the first time in more than 15 years, India’s economy is growing faster than China’s.  At least that was the case for 2015; according to government figures released Monday.  But there’s more to this story, and HPR’s Bill Dorman has it in today’s Asia Minute.

India’s economy grew 7.5% last year…faster than China’s growth rate of 6.9%.  But there’s a cautious reaction in some quarters.  Last year, India’s statistics ministry revised some of its measurements, and skeptical economists say it may overstate the case for growth.

Holly Golabek / Flickr
Holly Golabek / Flickr

It’s been another volatile week on global stock markets. Stock prices have rallied around the world today, although they’re still down since the start of the year.  And the declines have been even steeper in several Asia Pacific markets—but not all of them. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

Daniel Ramirez / Flickr
Daniel Ramirez / Flickr

Today is Black Friday – a day where many retailers see their margins go from the red into the black.

But this year more and more people are turning to the digital marketplace to gather up gifts.  A Google search on holiday shopping reveals that last year- 40% of holiday shopping occurred online…with more than half of consumers using a smartphone or tablet.

Wikipedia Commons
Wikipedia Commons

The World Bank says exports make up nearly 14% of the US economy.  For South Korea, the percentage is more than triple that figure - making the economy dependent on trade.  HPR’s Bill Dorman recently returned from a reporting trip to South Korea with the East West Center and has more on the country’s economic picture in today’s Asia Minute.

Wikipedia Commons
Wikipedia Commons

Today is not only the start of a new month, but on the corporate calendar, it’s also the first day of the fourth quarter of 2015.  And investors in Asia are hoping that means better days are coming.  HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

The third quarter was a rough one for investors around the world.

Wikipedia Commons
Wikipedia Commons

China’s President is in Washington State today and the Prime Minister of India will be in New York tomorrow.  But the leaders of both countries got some troubling news this week from the Asian Development Bank—which says growth in Asia’s two most populous countries continues to slow. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

The 7% solution may not be working for China’s economy.

denharsh.com / Flickr
denharsh.com / Flickr

Stock market volatility is continuing around the world today.  While investors are making different judgments about various markets, in Asia there’s a particular concern about one category. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

These are challenging days for emerging markets in Asia.

David Dennis / Flickr
David Dennis / Flickr

  Now that China has devalued its currency, what effects could Hawaii feel?  Pacific Business News looks at this from a couple of angles; editor in chief A. Kam Napier has more.

First, it’s worth pointing out that the Chinese yuan is hardly the only currency to lose value against the U.S. dollar, nor has it taken the biggest fall.  As many Menendez, an international business development expert writes in PBN this week: The Euro has declined 18% and the Japanese yen 22% against the dollar over the past year.

Wikipedia
Wikipedia

Hawaii’s legislature won’t be back in session until January, and the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives are both in recess until after Labor Day. India’s parliament just wrapped up its latest proceedings this week—but the headlines are about what did NOT happen. HPR’s Bill Dorman explains in today’s Asia Minute.

Legislative achievements are relative.

It’s true for lawmakers in any representative democracy--some sessions are just more productive than others.

Global Panorama / Flickr
Global Panorama / Flickr

Indonesia is one of the Asian economies hit by China’s currency devaluation. It’s been a busy week for the president—who has already shaken up his cabinet and is about to deliver his first State of the Union address. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

Joko Widodo has been president of Indonesia for less than a year. He’s the first president of the country to not come from the military or the politically-connected elite. He used to run a furniture business in Jakarta, where he later became mayor.

Japanexperterna.se / Flickr
Japanexperterna.se / Flickr

China devalued its currency Tuesday, driving it to its biggest one-day drop in more than twenty years. The move took global currency markets by surprise. But what does it mean for the rest of the region? HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

A weaker currency makes a country’s exports cheaper while boosting the price of imports.

That’s the way the economics work. The politics are more complicated. Especially when it comes to China.

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