education

Molly Solomon
Molly Solomon

One element of homelessness that doesn’t always get a lot of attention: the impact on young children, and in particular their education. There’s a group on Oahu that focuses on providing free preschool for homeless children and families. HPR’s Molly Solomon paid a visit and has this report.

About a dozen families stand in a circle, holding hands as they sing their morning pule, or prayer. They’re by a parking lot for a pair of homeless shelters in Kapolei. That’s where many of these families are living.

Pixabay Commons
Pixabay Commons

The Hawai‘i State Teachers Association says higher taxes are needed to improve education in the state.

The group has released a 10-part agenda for the 2016 legislative session. Topics include a reduction in class sizes, teacher retention, equal access to preschool, and an end to high stakes testing. The measure also calls for adequate funding of rural schools and repairs to air conditioning.

To fund the project – the measure recommends a one-percent increase in the state general excise tax. Corey Rosenlee is the HSTA President.

Ken Lund / Flickr
Ken Lund / Flickr

There’s some good news coming out of the University of Hawai‘i.

According to a report released by the University - graduation rates at UH Mānoa continue to rise.  A campus wide initiative to utilize new technology, an updated student road map called the STAR system, and counseling within individual colleges are being credited with the rise.   From 2010 to 2015 the six-year rate has increased from 48.6% to 57.1%.  The four-year graduation rate has increased from 17.5% to 27.9%.

Flickr / Eric Rolph
Flickr / Eric Rolph

Sweltering summer temperatures have put the heat on the Department of Education to cool Hawai‘i classrooms. The DOE says they’re installing 250 portable AC units across the state. But as HPR’s Molly Solomon reports, some experts are hoping the department will also consider long term solutions to beat the heat.

Whether it’s a classroom or an office, when you’re talking about hot buildings, a good place to start is the roof, says Stephen Allen, an HPU professor who teaches courses in sustainable building. “Most of the heat gain for the buildings comes in through the roof.”

Molly Solomon
Molly Solomon

This year’s heat wave has brought record temperatures to the islands. Much of it felt inside the state’s sweltering classrooms, where most are without central air conditioning. Those high temperatures bring more than just discomfort for students, they can also be dangerous. HPR’s Molly Solomon reports.

pixabay.com
pixabay.com

We got an update on several of the key initiatives from the State Department of Business, Economic Development and Tourism. We’ll get the latest on Broadband, the Creative Media industry, Tech and a new educational program developed by Pixar rolling out to the DOE.

ChefSteps / Flickr
ChefSteps / Flickr

Kapi‘olani Community College has broken ground for a new culinary school campus.  The Culinary Institute of the Pacific at Diamond Head is located at the former site of the Cannon Club.

The school will offer students an advanced professional certificate in culinary management.  The 25-million-dollar first phase includes two classroom buildings, parking, and an outdoor cooking area. Future plans include pastry and confectionary classrooms… as well as a teaching restaurant.  John Morton is the Vice President of the U-H Community College systems. 

Molly Solomon
Molly Solomon

Students in Nānākuli are spending the summer learning about the environment in their own backyard. The Mālama ‘Āina Field School is a hands-on summer program that focuses on getting more students engaged and excited about science and math. HPR’s Molly Solomon visited the camp and has this report.

Wikipedia Commons
Wikipedia Commons

We talked with members of the brand new Science Communicators Ohana from the University of Hawaii at Manoa. In today's world, understanding science has become more important than ever before. But what forms of communication are best suited for advancing science literacy?

Moyan Brenn / Flickr
Moyan Brenn / Flickr

What’s more important to you—your health or your child’s education? That’s one of the questions that a credit card company recently asked several thousand wealthy people in Asia. And the results varied depending on the country involved. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

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