fish

Local I'a

A local organization is on a mission to connect people with the story of their seafood. The organization called Local I‘a uses a subscription service to provide consumers and chefs with fresh, local boat-to-plate fish. HPR reporter Kuʻuwehi Hiraishi has this story.

Today, a majority of Hawaiian fishponds have been lost to coastal development and urbanization. But a growing, community-based movement is working to restore these fishponds as a foundation for sustainable fish production.  Researchers at the University of Hawai’i at Mānoa are now looking to Hawaiian language newspapers for help. HPR’s Kuʻuwehi Hiraishi reports.

Flickr / Yasuhiro Chatani
Flickr / Yasuhiro Chatani

Most projections of the impact of climate change and sea level rise focus on flooding and agriculture, but a new report from the UN suggests major changes in fisheries as well…we have more from Neal Conan in today’s Pacific News Minute.

Flickr / Gildenjen
Flickr / Gildenjen

For the second year in a row, Hawai‘i longline fishermen are on course to hit their annual limit for bigeye tuna. And again, it’s much earlier than expected. The island’s longline fleet will close in Western and Central pacific waters this Friday, and larger vessels in the Eastern region will also be halted a few days later. HPR’s Molly Solomon has more.

The Nature Conservancy
The Nature Conservancy

Water, or wai in the Hawaiian language, is the heart of life in Hawaiian Islands. It maintains the many precious ecosystems across the state, it drives the agricultural economy, provides fresh drinking water, and unlimited health benefits. It's no wonder then that water lies at the heart of Hawaiian culture as the most treasured natural resource and a central cultural pillar.

Christopher Phillips explains...

Noe Tanigawa
Noe Tanigawa

  Ecologists and divers are the first to wax poetic about Palau, recognized as one of the richest underwater dive spots in the world.  Palau’s reefs are at the crossroads of three of the planet's major currents and the nutrient-dense water helps create the most bio-diverse region in the world, here in the Pacific.  In this final segment of a series on Palau, HPR’s Noe Tanigawa takes a look at the future.

Hawaii's Longline Bigeye Quota Puts Ahi Season On Ice

Aug 14, 2015
Molly Solomon
Molly Solomon

Hawai‘i longline fishermen have hit their annual limit for bigeye tuna in Pacific waters, in the Western and Central Pacific region on August 5 and more recently in the Eastern Pacific for larger vessels. That doesn’t mean there won’t be tuna at local stores and restaurants. But it does mean some changes. HPR’s Molly Solomon reports.

Flickr/Thomas Shahan 3
Flickr/Thomas Shahan 3

New research suggests small-scale fisheries could have big benefits for local communities. That’s according to a new study that highlights the economic impact of community supported reef fisheries. HPR’s Molly Solomon explains.

Opah: First Discovered Warm-Blooded Fish

May 16, 2015
NOAA / Ralph Pace
NOAA / Ralph Pace

  It’s not just mammals and birds that belong to the warm blooded family. Opah is now believed to be the world’s first known fish to be completely warm-blooded. That’s according to researchers at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. HPR’s Molly Solomon has more.

Wegner’s findings are published in the recent issue of Science.

Molly Solomon
Molly Solomon

Hawai‘i could see its first community supported fishery as early as next year. The concept is similar to community supported agriculture, where customers bypass the supermarket and pay farmers directly for a weekly delivery of fresh produce. Now, as HPR’s Molly Solomon reports, that same idea is making the leap from land to sea.

John Kaneko

The western and central Pacific ocean are the world’s largest tuna fishery, an industry worth seven billion dollars a year.   The stakes were high as a battle over sustainable harvesting of this resource came to a head  in Australia earlier this month.   In Hawai’i, meanwhile, families are monitoring the availability of ‘ahi, or big eye tuna, like hawks  and traditionally, demand comes to a climax on New Year’s day.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports.

http://www.hawaii-seafood.org/