hawaiian history

Ku'uwehi Hiraishi

Thousands of native Hawaiians turned out for the ʻOnipaʻa Kākou march yesterday. The event commemorated the 125th Anniversary of the overthrow of the Hawaiian Kingdom. HPR Reporter Kuʻuwehi Hiraishi was there and has this story.

Ku'uwehi Hiraishi

We are less than a day away from Thanksgiving, and if you’re a conscious consumer, you’re preparing that mindful holiday meal. Is it all locally-sourced? Did you meticulously calculate portions to eliminate waste? Perhaps you went vegan? In Hawai‘i, an increased awareness of our food choices is also giving way to a raised consciousness about this American holiday and what it means. HPR’s Kuʻuwehi Hiraishi has this story.

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The concept of private property was introduced to Hawaiʻi with the Great Māhele of 1848. That action is often blamed for a lack of land ownership among native Hawaiians…a situation that lasts to this day. Some also say it plays a role in explaining why Native Hawaiians are statistically at the bottom of the barrel when it comes to quality of life. HPRʻs Kuʻuwehi Hiraishi reports on research that sheds new light on this complex history of land in Hawaiʻi.

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Research that reframes our thoughts about one of the biggest events in Hawaiʻi's history is sparking conversations.

The Great Māhele of 1848 changed landownership laws in Hawaiʻi forever by allowing private ownership of land. The conventional understanding is the māhele was key in native Hawaiians being dispossessed of land.

Geographer Donovan Preza uncovered information that departs from this storyline. His research argues the māhele helped secure Hawaiian rights in land rather than destroy them.

Preza explains:

Town Square: Revising Versus Commemoratting History

Aug 24, 2017
Department of Energy

  Today on Town Square, we’ll look at the function of tangible memories of America’s slave past and in our state, reminders of the annexation of a kingdom. Are we trying to revise history to make it less painful and more palatable or are we losing the physical remembrance of events not to be repeated?

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Fourth of July festivities are set for tomorrow across the island chain to celebrate America’s 242nd birthday. On the grounds of the ‘Iolani Palace in Honolulu, one group is commemorating another July Fourth with a dramatic re-enactment of an event in Hawaiian history that took place a little more than a century ago. HPR’s Kuʻuwehi Hiraishi has this story.