HI-SEAS

Brian Ramos

HI-SEAS; Big island Tourism; Hana Flights

Wikimedia Commons
Wikimedia Commons

Six crew members are working their way through a University of Hawai‘i project simulating an 8 month mission on Mars. The team has completed nearly three-quarters of its time with the Hawai‘i Space Exploration Analog and Simulation, or “HI-SEAS,” program on the slopes of Mauna Loa on Hawai‘i Island. In China, a smaller group has just started a similar mission with some differences. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

Wikimedia Commons
Wikimedia Commons

  We’ll catch up with the latest batch of Mars explorers in Hi-SEAS, or the Hawaii Space Exploration Analog and Simulation. With a new crew spending 8 months on Mauna Loa, we’ll find out what new experiments are on their manifest during this long-duration mission.

www.soest.hawaii.edu
www.soest.hawaii.edu

We’ll catch up with the latest cohort of explorers in Hi-SEAS or Hawaii Space Exploration Analog and Simulation.  This Mars simulation involves a yearlong stay in the Big Island habitat. We’ll find out how the crew dealt with the long duration mission.

The Conversation: Tuesday, September 6th, 2016

Sep 6, 2016
Flickr - Jai Mansson

First Nations and Conservation; Life on Mars; Skirting Affordable Housing Regulations; Neal Conan


First we'll look at the latest tech news and happenings in Hawaii and beyond. Then joining us today is GB Hajim from Hawaii Con to tell us about what's new with Hawaii's only scifi, comix convention. Then we have Meli James from Blue Startups to tell us about the upcoming Startup Paradise Demo Day. Finally, we'll talk to Kim Binsted and Simon Engler about HI-SEAS, the Mars analog and long during living in a remote habitat.

Food Researchers Wrap Up Mission to "Mars"

Aug 14, 2013
Flickr / University of Hawai‘i at Manoa
Flickr / University of Hawai‘i at Manoa

Researchers have been living inside a remote habitat 8,000 feet atop Mauna Loa. They’re part of a NASA-funded study to simulate what it’s like to live on Mars. HPR’s Molly Solomon has more.

You can find more information on the study at the HI-SEAS website.