invasive species

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Rise in Suicide; Albizia Wood; Manoa Heritage Center; Taimane

Flickr

Governor David Ige proclaimed today, April 25, ʻŌhiʻa Lehua Day in Hawaiʻi. Over the past eight years, millions of ʻōhiʻa lehua trees on Hawaiʻi Island died from a fungal disease known as Rapid ʻŌhiʻa Death. Not much was known about the disease until now. HPR Reporter Kuʻuwehi Hiraishi has this stoy.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Southeast Region

Invasive species have been corrupting Hawaiʻi's environment since the first human contact, but recent generations have seen new invasive species arriving at an ever-increasing rate. To date there's been no single statewide agency to deal with the problem, which is why state lawmakers are considering Senate Bill 2399. The measure would create a "Hawaiʻi Invasive Species Authority."

U.S. Department of Agriculture / Flickr

March for Our Lives, Invasive Species Control, Civic Clubs, Title IX, Esports in Hawaii

Using Dogs to Track Invasive Chameleons

Feb 28, 2018
Wikipedia

Scientists charged with protecting our endangered species are turning to man’s best friend to ferret out rats, slugs, and Jackson's Chameleons. Those invasive species threaten endangered snails but are often very difficult to locate.

U.S. Air Force

Medical Aid in Dying; Tracking Invasive Species; Changing Demographics and Elections

Ray Jerome Baker / Hawaii State Archives

One of Hawaiʻi’s famous native plants is under threat. The hala or pandanus tree can grow up to 30 feet tall and is characterized by its long, sharp and spiny leaves. Those trees are now being attacked by an invasive predator. And the cultural practitioners whose traditions depend on hala are feeling the impact. HPR’s Kuʻuwehi Hiraishi reports.

The Conversation: Monday, July 17th, 2017

Jul 17, 2017
Wikimedia Commons

Battling Invasive Species; Costs of Climate Change; Remembering a Death at Pearl Harbor

Flickr / Scot Nelson
Flickr / Scot Nelson

  Today on Bytemarks Café, we’ll talk about unwanted, invasive species that are establishing themselves in Hawaii. We’ll find out their effect on the environment and what efforts are being implemented to control or eradicate them.

Wikimedia Commons
Wikimedia Commons

Experts are saying it’s too late to eradicate an invasive plant on the Big Island.

Wikimedia Commons
Wikimedia Commons

Invasive species are a familiar problem in Hawai‘i. They are a challenge for any island community—and that includes New Zealand—which is trying a new tactic in an old fight. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

Wikimedia Commons
Wikimedia Commons

A local conservation group is pushing for legislation to study and control wild parakeets on Kauai.

The Rose-ringed parakeet is believed to have been introduced to the island during the 1960s.

In recent decades, its population has grown exponentially raising health, agriculture and conservation concerns.

It's believed the parakeets pose a threat to Kauai's agricultural future by eating crops. And it's believed they will also strip the seeds of endangered native plants.

Marufish / Flickr
Marufish / Flickr

People on every island across the state are familiar with invasive species. One of the most dangerous is the little fire ant, found in the biggest concentration on the windward side of the Big Island of Hawai‘i. And now a similar problem is plaguing a part of Australia. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

  

  Invasive Alien Species, IAS, are organisms introduced outside their natural range. This week, Hawai'i committed itself to a comprehensive new bio security plan against invasive alien species, but its success depends partly on how vigilant others are.  In 2010, nearly all the world‘s governments agreed to address IAS, but today, only three percent of countries are on track to meet international commitments.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports the Honolulu Challenge issued at the World Conservation Congress hopes to reinvigorate positive efforts.

The Conversation: Tuesday, March 22nd, 2016

Mar 22, 2016
Flickr - Alain Wibert

Hawaii Democratic Caucus;  Recycling Invasive Algae;  Neal Conan;  Bestselling Author Simon Winchester

Discussion of the Democratic Presidential Poll: Rep Takashi Ohno

Yvonne Yarber Carter
Yvonne Yarber Carter

Fountain Grass originates from Africa and was introduced to Hawaiʻi Island in the 20th century.  It has become a major threat due to its adaptation to fire.  The wild fires that sometimes rage on the Kona coast destroy native plants and clear the way for fountain grass to move in.

Christopher Phillips explains...

Big Island Invasive Species Committee
Big Island Invasive Species Committee

Invasive species threaten the well being of native flora and fauna. This threat takes many forms, a fungus, a disease, a plant or animal. The legacy of the presence of invasive species is felt across the islands. On Hawai'i island, the Big Island Invasive Species Committee is conducting outreach and education projects, and building strategies to combat invasive species.

Christopher Phillips explains...

Kauaʻi Coqui

Feb 3, 2016
J.B. Friday, University of Hawaiʻi
J.B. Friday, University of Hawaiʻi

The Coqui frog threat is far more serious than mere noise pollution. It dines on unique species of spiders and insects and competes with endemic birds and other native fauna. On the Garden Isle, the Kauaʻi Invasive Species Committee has successfully managed to eradicate an army of invading Coqui frogs.

Christopher Phillips explains...

Office of Mauna Kea Management (OMKM)
Office of Mauna Kea Management (OMKM)

A large portion of the land mass of Hawaiʻi Island, is contained on the slopes of the tallest mountain in the world, Mauna Kea. The mountain is host to a variety of ecosystems, stretching from the coastal waters, to the arid aeolian desert of the summit area.

Christopher Phillips explains...

The Nature Conservancy
The Nature Conservancy

One of the most notorious and well documented threats to Hawaiʻi's forests ecosystem, comes in the form of sheep, pigs, and goats – the ungulates. The ungulates are responsible for much of the ecological devastation that has befallen the forest understory. Many precious plants species have been brought to the brink of extinction by the insatiable appetites of the ungulates.

Christopher Phillips explains...

The Nature Conservancy
The Nature Conservancy

Water, or wai in the Hawaiian language, is the heart of life in Hawaiian Islands. It maintains the many precious ecosystems across the state, it drives the agricultural economy, provides fresh drinking water, and unlimited health benefits. It's no wonder then that water lies at the heart of Hawaiian culture as the most treasured natural resource and a central cultural pillar.

Christopher Phillips explains...

Flickr / USDAgov
Flickr / USDAgov

Hawai‘i is ground zero when it comes to tackling invasive species. Nowhere is that more apparent than on the Big Island, where residents deal with everything from little fire ants to coqui frogs. And as HPR’s Molly Solomon reports, it’s the focus of an upcoming community forum.

hatchetcaye.com
hatchetcaye.com

  Here in Hawaii, Lionfish are an exotic aquarium attraction, with their long poisonous spines.

In the Atlantic Ocean, Red Lionfish have become an invasive species with no natural predators. They often eat up to ninety-percent of the smaller fish in a reef. But adding them into local fisheries in the Atlantic as a form of “conservational hunting” controls their numbers. They‘re caught…cooked…and taste a lot like red snapper. To protect Pacific fish, laws prevent their release into Hawaiian waters. Mark Hixon is a professor at the University of Hawaii at Manoa. 

 

Joining us today is William Hozey to tell us about the International VEX Robotics Summer Games. Then we have Lihla Noori from the Hawaii Conservation Alliance to tell us about the Conservation Conference called “Navigating Change in the Pacific Islands”.  Finally, we'll find out how the Nature Conservancy leverages the crowd and technology to find invasive species.

First we'll look at the latest tech news and happenings in Hawaii and beyond. Then joining us today is Marco Morawec to tell us about the Firehose Weekend for high school students and Meli James from HVCA to tell us about the relaunch of the Hawaii Venture Capital Association. Finally, we'll find out how citizens can help scientists, find invasive species and help fight plant diseases.   

An Environmental War That's For The Birds

Jan 29, 2014
Flickr / carla kishinami
Flickr / carla kishinami

Cattle egrets and barn owls are common birds around the islands. Before statehood, they were brought in to control pests. But they’ve become a threat to native and endangered birds. That’s led the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to propose a rule change to allow them to be killed. And that’s stirring controversy among wildlife biologists and animal advocacy groups, who say we should be looking at other solutions. HPR’s Molly Solomon reports.

Little Fire Ants Cause Big Problems

Jan 13, 2014
Hawaii Department of Agriculture
Hawaii Department of Agriculture

They’re no bigger than the head of a pin, but the Little Fire Ant can cause a huge amount of damage. The stinging ants have been on Hawaii Island for years. And now officials are worried it’s spreading to outer islands. HPR’s Molly Solomon reports.

"Invasion: Little Fire Ants in Hawaii" screening dates:

Flickr / whatstaiters
Flickr / whatstaiters

One of the most important duties of those who care for Hawaii's highest peak is conserving the natural resources. That includes both keeping invasive species out, and replanting endangered species. From Hawaii Island, HPR's Sherry Bracken tells us more.