Lava

Syracuse University Lava Project

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Hawaii Volcanoes National Park
Hawaii Volcanoes National Park

Visitors looking to see active lava flowing into the ocean on Hawai‘i’s Big Island will have a new vantage point. Just a few days after a 26-acre lava delta crashed into the sea, the Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park has opened a new viewing area for the public.

Molly Solomon
Molly Solomon

Lava from Kīlauea has been erupting from the Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō vent since 1983. Recently the flow reached the ocean, for the first time in three years. Thousands of visitors and residents have been flocking to Kalapana to see it for themselves.

USGS
USGS

Lava flowing from Kīlauea is the subject of a new study. Researchers from Hawai‘i and the mainland are partnering on a three-year project to better understand active volcanoes. And as HPR’s Molly Solomon reports, it could lead to improved predictions and disaster preparedness.

Dealing with an active lava flow can be unpredictable. Pāhoa residents learned this firsthand, after spending months in limbo as lava neared the Big Island town. A new study may pinpoint ways to better assess volcanoes.

Malama Market Returns to Pahoa

Mar 19, 2015
Malama Market
Malama Market

It’s been three months since Pāhoa’s Mālama Market closed its doors. Back in December, lava crept within a couple hundred yards of the store. But now, with the lava stalled, the supermarket has reopened. HPR’s Molly Solomon reports.

Lava Picks Up Speed Toward Pahoa Marketplace

Dec 15, 2014
USGS
USGS

UPDATE: Malama Market, the grocery store at Pāhoa Marketplace, announced it plans to evacuate and close its doors by Thursday, December 18th at 6 p.m. The store, which opened its Pāhoa branch in 2005, will begin the process of packing up the shop on Tuesday.

The lava flow in Pāhoa on the Big Island has picked up speed again, moving about 300 yards since yesterday. It’s now about 1.2 miles from the intersection of Pāhoa Village Road and Highway 130.

hvo.wr.usgs.gov
hvo.wr.usgs.gov

The slow moving lava flow on Hawaii Island has set fire to its first home, making contact with the residence just before noon.  The home’s renters had already left the residence.  Firefighters on site will let the structure burn down, but will control any wildfires that threaten other homes.  Hawaii County Civil Defense Director Darryl Oliveira said the nearest home is about a half mile away. 

Voices From Pahoa: Claire Napeahi

Nov 3, 2014
USGS
USGS

As lava continues to flow into residential properties in Pahoa, mixed emotions are being felt in the community. Some are anxiously awaiting Pele’s arrival fearing the destruction she may bring. Others view her presence as an honor. HPR’s Molly Solomon is in Pahoa and shares one perspective.

Hawaii County Civil Defense and public safety personnel are working 24/7 in the area to maintain close observations of the lava flow.

Lava Fears Prompt Some Businesses to Close Up Shop

Nov 3, 2014
Molly Solomon
Molly Solomon

While the lava continued to stall over the weekend, USGS geologists stressed the flow is far from over, leaving residents and business owners in Pāhoa preparing for the possibility they may be cut off. As HPR’s Molly Solomon reports, local shops and restaurants are grappling with the decision of whether or not to stay.

Lava Flow Overtakes Pāhoa Japanese Cemetery

Oct 26, 2014
USGS
USGS

Hawaii County Civil Defense are keeping a close watch on a lava flow that continues to move toward Pāhoa. It's picked up speed in recent days, moving at a speed of 10-15 yards per day. Officials say evacuations may be just days away. 

www.bigislandvideonews.com
www.bigislandvideonews.com

  The lava creeping slowly towards Pāhoa continues to advance and is now a little under a mile from Apa’a Street near the Pahoa transfer station.  A brush fire yesterday of about 300 acres is mostly out and fully contained.  It is also creating  smokey conditions.   As the situation changes, the County and State are taking additional steps to protect peoples’ health.  HPR’s Sherry Bracken tells us more.