noe tanigawa

Noe Tanigawa
Noe Tanigawa

  The 2010 U.S. Census reported that Chamorro, the indigenous people of the Mariana Islands, are the third largest Pacific Islander group in the US.  Chamorro arrived in Hawaii aboard whaling ships in the  1800’s, and a community of seven thousand lives here now.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports on Craig Santos Perez,  a Chamorro writer living in Hawai‘i who has just won an American Book Award.

Noe Tanigawa
Noe Tanigawa

    Last April, social media buzzed as sign wavings for Mauna Kea “protectors” were held as far away as Kentucky and Tonga. With that first wave of publicity over, the “protectors” both on Mauna Kea and Haleakalā now say there's a guiding principal that keeps them going.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports on Kapu Aloha. 

Ara Feducia
Ara Feducia

 

  

   Some say Benjamin Franklin’s pamphlet for Pennsylvania hospital patients was the world’s first zine, that’s short for magazine.  Since the dawn of the printing press, Thomas Paine and others certainly did publish leaflets and chapbooks on topics dear to them.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports on an upcoming zine workshop where you too can sound off in print.

Experience a zine workshop this Saturday, 10-4pm at Mori by Art and Flea in Ward Village.  

All That Matters: Zine Workshop

Saturday, July 25th 2015

10am - 4pm

chee yun
chee yun

 

   What began as a fledgling dream of musical summers in the cooler climes of Waimea, Hawai‘i, is now becoming a sturdy community asset.  The Hawai‘i Performing Arts Festival welcomes over 70 students this year, and is in the midst of 30 public performances, many of them free.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa offers this look at an exciting performance coming soon to Honolulu.

MGF
MGF

Every year, the Prince Lot Hula Festival offers a prime opportunity to visit Moanalua Gardens, arguably the most beautiful hula venue in Hawai‘i.  This non-competitive festival honors Prince Lot Kapuāiwa who revived hula in Moanalua when it was still publicly banned.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa offers a look at the history of this celebrated area.

  

Kumu kahua

  

 

   In early April, three pirates hatched a plan to get people out of their snuggly homes and into Kumu Kahua Theatre.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa visited the theatre recently to find out why and how.

The New Play Festival runs Sunday through Tuesday, June 21st through 23rd at Kumu Kahua.  Eventbrite is handling advance tickets, or get tickets at Kumu one hour prior to performance.  

Connect with the New Play Festival on Facebook.

Daniel Ramirez / Flickr

  

  This week Friday and Saturday,  the 99th Annual King Kamehameha Celebration events take place on O‘ahu.   HPR’s Noe Tanigawa gives a preview of the Kamehameha  Parade, known for its floral panorama of the islands.

The Kamehameha Celebration Parade begins at 9am Saturday near ‘Iolani Palace, running down Ala Moana and Kalākaua to Kapi‘olani park for the afternoon’s ho‘olaule‘a.   For more on the King Kamehameha celebrations on O'ahu and across the state. 

http://ags.hawaii.gov/kamehameha/

noe tanigawa

    Right now, at the prestigious Venice Biennale, 56 countries are presenting their most important contemporary art and artists.  In a surprise move, France selected a sound artist as their official representative, and that same artist has just opened a new installation on Maui.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa visited the show at the Maui Arts and Cultural Center.

This exhibit is free and open to the public. 

Now through July 18, Schaefer International Gallery
Tuesday - Sunday 10am - 5 pm
FREE Admission! (Also open before Castle Theater shows and during intermission)

noe tanigawa

   

  

  

   You can see Kilohana peak at the top of Kalihi valley from Mokauea, a tiny island just off the coastline.  Over forty fishponds once laced the area, ali‘i had summer residences , and a struggle over land rights literally blazed on the island in the 1970’s.  Today, we board a canoe with HPR’s Noe Tanigawa, for a visit.

Due to past experiences, the Mokauea Fisherman’s Association requests that any visits or requests for information be arranged through Kehaulani Kupihea (Mokauea@gmail.com).

noe tanigawa

The idea with these two stories is to situate ourselves in a Hawaiian understanding of place.  Hawaiian land divisions reveal an intimate knowledge of resources.  One key concept is that of the ahupua‘a, a pie shaped wedge of land with its point on a mountain top, widening down to the seashore.  Ahupua‘a acknowledge the link between land and sea, and make the resources of both available to those who dwell within it.  

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