Pahoa

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Opioids in Hawaii; Repatriating Hawaiian Bones; Aloha From Lavaland

Molly Solomon
Molly Solomon

Nearly a year ago, lava from Kīlauea started flowing towards the Big Island town of Pāhoa. The lava has since cooled, but has forever changed the landscape of the small town. And as Hawaii Public Radio’s Molly Solomon reports, nowhere is that more apparent than at the Pāhoa Japanese Cemetery.

Malama Market Returns to Pahoa

Mar 19, 2015
Malama Market
Malama Market

It’s been three months since Pāhoa’s Mālama Market closed its doors. Back in December, lava crept within a couple hundred yards of the store. But now, with the lava stalled, the supermarket has reopened. HPR’s Molly Solomon reports.

UH Researcher Uses Data To Map Puna Lava Flow

Jan 7, 2015
USGS
USGS

Lava flowing from Kīlauea’s Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō Vent has left the lower Puna community in a state of limbo. The slow moving disaster has prompted one researcher to look at how residents are coping with the flow. HPR’s Molly Solomon spoke with him and has this report.

hvo.wr.usgs.gov
hvo.wr.usgs.gov

In Pāhoa, the new finger of lava continues to move downhill at a rate of around 250 yards a day.  Wet conditions have reduced smoke pollution and the risk of brushfires started by the lava.

Lava Picks Up Speed Toward Pahoa Marketplace

Dec 15, 2014
USGS
USGS

UPDATE: Malama Market, the grocery store at Pāhoa Marketplace, announced it plans to evacuate and close its doors by Thursday, December 18th at 6 p.m. The store, which opened its Pāhoa branch in 2005, will begin the process of packing up the shop on Tuesday.

The lava flow in Pāhoa on the Big Island has picked up speed again, moving about 300 yards since yesterday. It’s now about 1.2 miles from the intersection of Pāhoa Village Road and Highway 130.

Sherry Bracken
Sherry Bracken

  

  The lava front closest to Pahoa Village has now stalled and cooled, with breakouts around 3 1/2 miles upslope.  With no immediate threat to homes or businesses, Hawaii County officials have reopened Pahoa Village Road.  But starting last August, local residents had to prepare for lava inundation.  Many moved.  Every family has their story, and HPR's Sherry Bracken has one.

hvo.wr.usgs.gov
hvo.wr.usgs.gov

Hawaii County Civil Defense personnel flew over the active lava flow Tuesday afternoon and reported that active lava breakouts are around 3.3 miles above Apa'a Street.  The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory has done a thermal assessment of the lower part of the lava flow sitting outside Pahoa and say the flow closest to Pahoa Village is no longer active and has cooled.  But they warn that the lava flow could resume its activity. 

hvo.wr.usgs.gov
hvo.wr.usgs.gov

As lava continues to move slowly towards Pahoa, costs are increasing for Hawaii County, including those for emergency services and road construction.  But there's another cost:  the county's long term potential for revenue.  HPR's Sherry Bracken has the story. 

hvo.wr.usgs.gov
hvo.wr.usgs.gov

  As lava continues to threaten Pāhoa Village, Hawai'i County is facing increased costs to continue to provide access and services to lower Puna.  HPR's Sherry Bracken talked about that with Mayor Billy Kenoi.

www.hawaiicounty.gov
www.hawaiicounty.gov

  Breakouts from the main lava flow approaching Pahoa are continuing in three areas.  While the front itself remains stalled, its future path remains uncertain.  When it became clear in August that lava from Pu'u 'O'o Vent was heading towards Pahoa Village, it surprised many residents.  But local geologists were not shocked, including one who spoke with HPR's Sherry Bracken.

hvo.wr.usgs.gov
hvo.wr.usgs.gov

  

Why a Pahoa Bookstore is Staying Open

Nov 12, 2014
Molly Solomon

The lava flow creeping through Pāhoa continues to remain active, claiming its first residential home earlier this week. Many residents have already packed up and left the area, but as HPR’s Molly Solomon reports, some businesses have chosen to stay.

lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com
lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com

 As the lava flow from Kīlauea’s Pu’u ‘O’o Vent continues to creep through Puna just outside of Pahoa, Hawai'i County officials are facing a series of decisions. A major one concerns roads. HPR's Sherry Bracken has that part of the story. 

hvo.wr.usgs.gov
hvo.wr.usgs.gov

The lava flow creeping through Pahoa has breached the fence line of the Pahoa Transfer Station and is now moving down a driveway around the perimeter of the property.  

Officials say the finger of lava measures about 12 feet long and two to three feet wide.  All hazardous materials were removed from the transfer station weeks ago.  

hvo.wr.usgs.gov
hvo.wr.usgs.gov

The slow moving lava flow on Hawaii Island has set fire to its first home, making contact with the residence just before noon.  The home’s renters had already left the residence.  Firefighters on site will let the structure burn down, but will control any wildfires that threaten other homes.  Hawaii County Civil Defense Director Darryl Oliveira said the nearest home is about a half mile away. 

Raven Hanna
Raven Hanna

  Hawaii County Civil Defense teams are still going door to door in Pahoa.  They're working with volunteers and talking with residents as the lava continues its slow movement.  Those volunteers have their own stories, and Sherry Bracken brings us one of them.

Pahoa Lava Slows

Nov 3, 2014
hvo.wr.usgs.gov
hvo.wr.usgs.gov

The lava flow in Pahoa has slow to a near halt, showing very little change since yesterday.  The flow front remains around 480 feet from the Pahoa Village roadway.  Most of the activity is happening further up from the flow.  Small breakouts 2 miles from the flow front which have moves around 200 yards since Friday.  Mike Poland is from Hawaiian Volcanoes Observatory.  He says the amount of pressure in lava will help to determine, where the breakouts will occur. 

Voices From Pahoa: Claire Napeahi

Nov 3, 2014
USGS
USGS

As lava continues to flow into residential properties in Pahoa, mixed emotions are being felt in the community. Some are anxiously awaiting Pele’s arrival fearing the destruction she may bring. Others view her presence as an honor. HPR’s Molly Solomon is in Pahoa and shares one perspective.

Hawaii County Civil Defense and public safety personnel are working 24/7 in the area to maintain close observations of the lava flow.

Lava Fears Prompt Some Businesses to Close Up Shop

Nov 3, 2014
Molly Solomon
Molly Solomon

While the lava continued to stall over the weekend, USGS geologists stressed the flow is far from over, leaving residents and business owners in Pāhoa preparing for the possibility they may be cut off. As HPR’s Molly Solomon reports, local shops and restaurants are grappling with the decision of whether or not to stay.

Pahoa Residents Pack Meeting on Lava Update

Oct 31, 2014
Molly Solomon
Molly Solomon

The leading edge of the lava slowed to a stall Thursday. The lava, which has not advanced in the past 24 hours, is still 480 feet from Pahoa Village Road. Hundreds of residents attended a community meeting last night seeking answers and information on the lava front. HPR’s Molly Solomon was in Pahoa and has this report.

USGS
USGS

The type of lava approaching Pahoa is a particular type of molten rock.  Hawaiians and volcanologists call this type of overlapping strain of lava--Pāhoehoe, a name introduced in 1875.  It flows smoothly from a volcano’s vent, coating the ground like a parking lot.  As it creeps along, it makes a sound like styrofoam being walked on, or Christmas ornaments breaking.  Its famous “ropey” texture is created as it encounters resistance in its path, causing it to bunch and layer.  Mike Poland is from Hawaiian Volcano Observatory. 

HELCO
HELCO

The molten lava creeping down the hill in Pahoa is consuming everything in its path.  Electric company officials feared the wooden utility poles in the path of the lava would burn down on contact, cutting off power to the area.  So workers with Hawaiian Electric Light Company sought advice from experts at UH Hilo and the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory.  They settled on a design that would wrap the pole in a heat resistant coating.  Rhea Lee from Hawaiian Electric talks about the science. 

Big Island Video News
Big Island Video News

 

   As lava moves into Pahoa Village, Hawaii County Civil Defense and the Community Emergency Response Teams have been going door to door to talk with residents and ensure they are ready to evacuate.  HPR's Sherry Bracken has the story of one couple who had that conversation.

lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com
lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com

  

  News coverage of the Pahoa lava flow has often been presented as a “horror movie in slow motion”. The focus for many has been a timeline to when the molten rock may reach Pahoa village. But some people are not happy with the negative tone of coverage.

Dana Kenny is a realtor with an office in Pahoa. He says that it will be sad if homes and roads are lost, but the town will not be destroyed, and the sense of panic is unnecessary.

He argues that on Maui, Hana has survived and is a popular destination, despite its isolation.

hvo.wr.usgs.gov
hvo.wr.usgs.gov

  The lava flow in Pahoa has been dominating news across the state in recent days. But it’s also getting a lot of attention in Asia. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute

hvo.wr.usgs.gov
hvo.wr.usgs.gov

  As lava continues to snake through the Pāhoa area,  most local residents are feeling anxious.   And the adults in a family need to address not only their own concerns but also the fears of their keiki.  HPR’s Sherry Bracken today brings us the second part of her conversation with a Hilo psychologist.

Molly Solomon
Molly Solomon

  In Pahoa, the main lava flow has slowed down, but smaller fingers are approaching buildings.

A North-side breakout is about 100 feet from the fence of the transfer station.  The South-side breakout is less than 100 feet from the residence that previously lost their storage shed.  The lava is expected to make contact with the home if it continues at its current rate.

hvo.wr.usgs.gov
hvo.wr.usgs.gov

  As lava continues its relentless advance through the Puna District of the Big Island, there has been a lot of emphasis on physical preparation.  But for everybody whose lives are going to be touched one way or the other by the advancing lava flow, dealing with the emotional fallout is also important.  HPR’s Sherry Bracken talked with a psychologist about some of the issues.

Lava Flow Quickly Advances Toward Pahoa

Oct 24, 2014
USGS
USGS

UPDATED:

A Friday morning flyover revealed the lava flow had moved 300 yards overnight. Hawaii County Civil Defense officials say the leading edge of the approaching flow is now 250 yards, or less than one tenth of a mile, from Apaa Street, near the Pāhoa Transfer Station.

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