plantation

Remembering the Reality of Plantation Life

Feb 7, 2018
Wikimedia Commons

The stories of everyday people aren’t often recorded. University of Hawaii-West Oahu’s Center for Labor Education and Research (CLEAR) is collating a priceless archive of Hawaii’s history: unedited first-person reminiscences of plantation life. 

Wikimedia Commons

Restricting Missile Alert Authority; Indigenous Rights Lawyer; Local Effects of Nuclear Testing; Remembering Plantation Life

Keʻeaumoku Kapu

For the first time in more than a century, land titles held by Hawaiʻi’s former sugar companies are being opened to challenge. At their peak in the 1930s, sugar plantations cultivated approximately 250,000 acres across the island chain. As plantations have sold off much of those holdings, attempts by new landowners to clear title are proving more challenging than imagined. HPR’s Kuʻuwehi Hiraishi reports.

Wikipedia Commons
Wikipedia Commons

75 years ago today, Hawai‘i was still reeling from Japan’s surprise attack on Pearl Harbor.  Life had already changed for local residents and it was going to change more—whether people lived in the city of Honolulu, on the plantations, or anywhere else in the territory.

Ray Sekiya was born in Kunia Camp, near Schofield Barracks.  He wrote down some of his memories about the immediate days after Pearl Harbor and the weeks that followed and he recently shared them with HPR.

Bittersweet End to Cane Plantation Days

Jan 6, 2016
Flickr / Averain
Flickr / Averain

Hawai‘i’s last sugar plantation is closing. Alexander and Baldwin announced Hawaiian Commercial & Sugar Company on Maui will stop producing sugar by the end of the year. HPR’s Molly Solomon reports...

Once upon a time in Hawai‘i, sugar was king. The industry powered politics, wealth, and helped form the identity of the Aloha State’s population. The closing of the sugar operations of Hawaiian Commercial & Sugar Company signifies the end of an era.