sovereignty

Flickr / LuxTonnerre
Flickr / LuxTonnerre

An election to determine a way forward on self-governance for Native Hawaiians has been canceled. Still leaders from the group Naʻi Aupuni say they will go forward with a four-week long constitutional convention next year. HPR’s Molly Solomon reports.
 

To avoid what could be years of litigation, organizers have terminated a vote some say may have been a path to Hawaiian nationhood. "No further votes will be accepted," said Kuhio Asam, the President of the group organizing the election, Naʻi Aupuni. "And no votes already cast will be counted."

creative commons
creative commons

 

On Wednesday, December 2nd, 2015, the U.S. Supreme Court granted an injunctionhalting the Na'i Aupuni election.  The Grassroot Institute, supported by the national conservative organization, Judicial Watch, is suing to stop the Na'i Aupuni election on grounds that it is unconstitutional because it involves only Native Hawaiians.  Na'i Aupuni claims theirs is a private election, privately funded, and therefore legal.  

Noe Tanigawa
Noe Tanigawa

 

   A year ago, the federal Department of the Interior, DOI, travelled throughout Hawai‘i soliciting comments on a path to Hawaiian nationhood.  Last week the DOI proposed a rule to facilitate governmental relations if Hawaiians form a unified government on their own.  Today, as part of HPR’s news series, Following Up,  Noe Tanigawa reports on how that path to nationhood is progressing.

Molly Solomon
Molly Solomon

The U.S. Interior Department is moving forward with a proposed rule that could lead to federal recognition of Native Hawaiians. The announcement comes one year after Department officials led a series of listening sessions across the state and on the mainland. But as HPR’s Molly Solomon reports, the decision now lies with the Native Hawaiian community to decide what it wants.

noe tanigawa

 

   The recent Scottish independence vote, with all its color and emotion, came after over 400 years in the British commonwealth.  Many Hawaiians followed the Scottish vote with interest, knowing that Department of the Interior hearings here indicate emotions do still run high over US actions in Hawai‘i just over 100 years ago.  In HPR’s continuing exploration of voices on Hawaiian sovereignty, Noe Tanigawa spoke with Lilikala Kame'eleihiwa, the Director of the Center for Hawaiian Studies. 

hawaii business

  

 

In HPR’s continuing series on Hawaiian sovereignty, Noe Tanigawa speaks with Oswald Stender.   A Kamehameha Schools graduate, Mr. Stender was CEO of Campbell Estate from 1974 to 1990, then, a Bishop Estate trustee from 1990 to 1999.  He has served as an Office of Hawaiian Affairs trustee since 2000.

University of Hawaii
University of Hawaii

    

  

 

   The U.S. Department of the Interior’s recent hearings in Hawai‘i revealed a number of those testifying believe the U.S. government does not have jurisdiction over these islands.  As part of  ongoing coverage of sovereignty issues, HPR’s Noe Tanigawa took up the idea with Dr. Keanu Sai, who has been studying the Hawai‘i-U.S. relationship for over 3 decades.   Dr. Sai's research has had broad influence on the sovereignty debate, and this interview attempts to present his view.

UH Manoa

  The U.S. Department of the Interior is holding meetings around Hawai’i, asking how the federal government should be involved in creating a Hawaiian nation.   Should the interior secretary propose establishing a government to government relationship with Hawaiians and help set it up? Or should the DOI leave it to the state, with possible federal requirements?  Some who have been studying the issue say, neither.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports.

Molly Solomon

Over 200 people packed the Hawaii State Capitol in the first of a series of meetings that could lead to federal recognition for Native Hawaiians. Officials from the federal government heard three and a half hours of testimony. And as HPR’s Molly Solomon reports, most of it was largely in opposition to the department’s plan.

Meetings will be held on Oahu all week:

• Monday, June 23 — Honolulu— 9:00 am to 12:00 pm, Hawaii State Capitol Auditorium