Trump

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

Today is Civil Liberties and the Constitution Day in Hawai‘i, honoring the birthday of Fred Korematsu, the man who challenged Executive Order 9066 in 1942.  That order allowed over 120,000 ethnic Japanese to be incarcerated during WWII.  Seventy percent of those prisoners were American citizens.  This detention is recognized as a clear violation of civil rights, but Americans at the time did not protest, and scholars today ask whether something like that could happen again.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports.   

creative commons
creative commons

In his first six months in office, Mr. Trump appointed a Supreme Court Justice, fired his FBI director, and withdrew the U.S. from the Paris climate accord.  The country has new tax rules and President Trump's appointees have restructured key government agencies, or changed long held practices, all amidst allegations of collusion with the Russians and unprecedented staff turnover.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports Hawai‘i Republicans are feeling a lift.

Hawaii J20
Hawaii J20

Monday’s ABC News/Washington Post poll cites a 36% job approval rating for President Trump, with those polled evenly divided on whether he is mentally stable.  The first year of Mr. Trump’s presidency has meant a life change for many in American society.  Here, three artists reflect on how they’ve adapted their practice to the socio-political moment.   HPR's Noe Tanigawa reports.

J20+
J20+

Ward Warehouse was expected to last fifteen years when it opened in 1975.  Now, over 40 years later, it will close in August to make way for a highrise.  Right now, along with sales galore, a few interesting new shops have taken old spaces.  The Paradise Cove art collective has a storefront, and so does J20+, an offshoot of the January 20th Inauguration Day protests.   HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports on their exhibition, Welcome to Free Speech.

Wayne Yoshioka

Two rallies last week demonstrated the great divide here over the Presidency of the United States.   HPR’s Wayne Yoshioka reports.

Gage Skidmore / Flickr
Gage Skidmore / Flickr

Shortly after the president concludes, Former Kentucky Governor Steve Beshear will deliver the Democratic Response to President Trump’s address. Beshear was chosen by Democratic Party leaders for his record, expanding affordable health care. NPR will have a transcript of Beshear’s remarks and journalists across the NPR newsroom will also be annotating his remarks.

Wikipedia
Wikipedia

President Trump will address a joint session of Congress for the first time on Tuesday evening at the Capitol, around 4 PM Hawaii Time. The address comes a day after Trump gave an outline of his budget plan for Congress, which would increase defense spending and make cuts to domestic programs. Following tradition, House Speaker Paul Ryan invited the president to make the speech to lay out his agenda in the early days of his new administration. NPR will offer this live transcript of the remarks, and NPR journalists with expertise in politics, immigration, business, law and more will offer their analysis and annotations.

Wayne Yoshioka
Wayne Yoshioka

Hawaii’s lawsuit against President Trump has been postponed.

YouTube Via CC Commons
YouTube Via CC Commons

While President-Elect Donald Trump has promised no new foreign business deals while he’s in office, projects already underway will go ahead, including two big developments in Indonesia. Now, Trump’s Indonesian business partner says he wants to run for President himself. More from Neal Conan in today’s Pacific News Minute.

Wikipedia Commons
Wikipedia Commons

As the President-elect continues to put together his cabinet, the rest of the world continues to wonder what the policies of the Trump Administration will be. That’s certainly true in the Asia Pacific. And this week, many business people in India are trying to figure out what Donald Trump might mean for their future. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

Wayne Yoshioka

There were two separate activities over the weekend that focused on the Trump Presidential victory.    HPR’s Wayne Yoshioka visited both events and filed this report. 

Gage Skidmore / Flickr
Gage Skidmore / Flickr

Japan’s Prime Minister will likely be the first Asian leader to meet face to face with Donald Trump since the presidential election. Shinzo Abe will see Trump next week. Other leaders in Asia are either reaching out to Trump or making plans for further communication. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe was already heading to Peru for a summit meeting of leaders of APEC--the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation forum.  Now Abe will leave Tokyo a little early and stop by New York next week to meet Donald Trump.

Tim Pierce / Flickr
Tim Pierce / Flickr

Protests across the country are springing up following the election of Donald Trump. Thousands filled the streets in at least 25 US cities on Wednesday and Thursday.  Major demonstrations were focused outside Trump properties.

Activist group World Can’t Wait Hawai‘i is hosting a rally this afternoon (Friday) on O‘ahu.  Organizer Liz Rees says it was enlightening to see protests happening across the country. 

The World Can’t Wait rally against Trump’s takes place this afternoon from 4-6pm at the Entrance to Ala Moana Beach Park.

Gage Skidmore / Flickr
Gage Skidmore / Flickr

As the world continues to consider the implications of a Donald Trump presidency, that process goes on across the Asia Pacific. And the focus varies depending on the country. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

At this early stage, it’s all nervous speculation.  How exactly will Donald Trump deal with the Asia Pacific?  A Thursday headline from Korea’s Joong Ang Daily says “Trump’s Victory Worries Korea.”

Wikipedia Commons
Wikipedia Commons

This week, PBN explores the campaign promises of Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump to ask, “who’s better for business?” Pacific Business News Editor in Chief A. Kam Napier has more.

We had a big assist from our national news room this week, which examined the platforms of Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton and Republican candidate Donald Trump.  Naturally, American City Business Journals is specifically interested in the impact on the nation’s business community.  We don’t endorse candidates, businesses can decide for themselves who they’d prefer based on the comparisons.

Gage Skidmore / Flickr
Gage Skidmore / Flickr

  Now that Donald Trump appears to be headed for the Republican nomination, international attention is shifting to what that might mean beyond America’s borders. Trump’s very presence in the November election means certain assumptions about U.S. foreign policy may come under question—including in the Asia Pacific. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.