Trashing Paradise

Hawai‘i Public Radio takes an in-depth look at ‘ōpala in the islands in a week-long special series “Trashing Paradise.”

From the lifespan and future of landfills to planning and policy choices facing voters and government officials, the topic of garbage is a timely one for all residents of Hawai‘i. Each island faces its own particular challenges, but we all need to consider the future implications of the decisions we’re making now when it comes to waste. The news team at HPR will consider a number of issues as part of this coverage

Andy Arthur / Flickr
Andy Arthur / Flickr

In our series this week “Trashing Paradise” we’ve been looking at a number of issues involving waste in Hawaii, and many of them differ from island to island.

noe tanigawa

 

   

For the past week, HPR has been looking at the issues Hawai‘i faces around solid waste. We’ve looked at the proliferation of plastic, the possibility of pollution from particles smaller than we now measure, and the struggles of each county to reduce mounting “waste” in landfills.  Over the past 20 years, a movement has been building around a mind shift—HPR’s Noe Tanigawa found that waste could translate into resources.

Wikipedia Commons
Wikipedia Commons

All this week we’re taking a closer look at ‘ōpala across the islands, in a series we call “Trashing Paradise.” Today we shift our focus to the Big Island of Hawai‘i—where earlier this year, Mayor Billy Kenoi announced a change in plans for the island’s future. HPR’s Bill Dorman reports.

You can find our entire "Trashing Paradise" series here.

Wayne Yoshioka

More than 900 million beverage containers are imported into Hawai’i each year.   Recycling them is one way to minimize the “trashing of paradise.”   HPR’s Wayne Yoshioka has this update on Hawai’i’s Hi-5 program.

You can find our entire "Trashing Paradise" series here.

NOAA Marine Debris Program / Flickr
NOAA Marine Debris Program / Flickr

HPR’s "Trashing Paradise" series continues with a look at the dangers of plastic runoff.

Trashing Paradise: Maui County

Apr 1, 2015
Herkko Hietanen / Flickr
Herkko Hietanen / Flickr

We continue our series this week “Trashing Paradise”, taking a closer look at ‘ōpala across the islands. Today we focus on Maui, where a little more than a year ago, Mayor Alan Arakawa signed an agreement to build a waste-to-energy plant on the island. The deal would allow California-based Anaergia Services to build the Maui Resource Recovery Facility at the Central Maui Landfill.  Not everyone thinks the project is the best solution for the island’s trash.  Eileen Chao has more from The Maui News.

Molly Solomon
Molly Solomon

All week, we’ve been taking a closer look at how Hawai‘i deals with its waste. It’s part of our series, “Trashing Paradise.” Today we focus on H-POWER, the waste to energy plant on O‘ahu. HPR’s Molly Solomon visited the facility where almost all of the island’s trash ends up.

You can find our entire "Trashing Paradise" series here.

Steven Guerrisi / Flickr
Steven Guerrisi / Flickr

As we continue our series “Trashing Paradise,” we wanted to take a look at what happens to garbage near the ocean when it doesn’t go where it’s supposed to go.

Smabs Sputzer / Flickr
Smabs Sputzer / Flickr

In our continuing series "Trashing Paradise," we take a look at the continuing fight against littering and the illegal dumping of personal garbage.

Pat Gegen

  

Hawai‘i Public Radio’s continuing look at solid waste this week focuses on the island of Kaua‘i  today.   In 2011, the county council adopted a Zero Waste Resolution, committing the county to diverting 70% of its waste away from landfills by 2023.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa found that on Kaua‘i waste disposal is on the verge of changes.  

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